Special Issue "Transport Phenomena in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Amir A. Aliabadi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: air quality and pollution; thermal comfort; thermofluids of air; urban environment; building energy systems; heating ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC-R) systems; turbulent flows; numerical weather prediction (NWP); computational fluid dynamics (CFD); experimental, analytical, and numerical thermofluids

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) of the earth is a thin layer of the atmosphere near the surface that responds to surface forcing within a time scale of 1 hour or less. There is growing interest in ABL studies specifically in the context of the two-way interaction between the ABL and anthropogenic activities. Many issues pertaining to extreme weather, climate change, and excess pollution require a deep understanding of transport phenomena within the ABL. Transport phenomena refer to the exchanges of momentum (wind velocity components), energy (temperature), and mass (water vapor, natural atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, and inert gases, as well as gaseous and particulate pollutants) within the ABL. Meanwhile, the transport phenomena within ABL are not well understood due to complex physical and chemical processes that are ever-present in the ABL. Transport phenomena can be studied in either the Eulerian or Lagrangian frameworks. Currently, the transport phenomena are understood in terms of numerous processes such as storage, advective transport, molecular diffusion, turbulent transport, surface emission–deposition, chemical reactions, phase change, and conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer. This Special Issue of Atmosphere is centered around understanding transport phenomena within the ABL from experimental, analytical, and numerical points of view. Articles are invited that aim to advance the understanding of transport phenomena in ABL in areas of 1) discovery (e.g., new or previously unstudied phenomena); 2) measurement techniques (e.g., in situ or remote sensing); 3) data processing (e.g., instrumentation, data collection, algorithm design, statistical analysis, etc.); 4) analytical modeling (e.g., closed-form solutions); and 5) numerical modeling (e.g., numerical weather prediction (NWP), computational fluid dynamics (CFD), etc.) across the scales from micro to meso scales. The proposed articles may study ABLs in rural, agricultural, urban, industrial, or remote environments. For instance, rural ABLs may be concerned with exchange processes over natural land types (e.g., forest, tundra, grasslands, oceans, etc.). Agricultural ABLs may be concerned with exchange processes over croplands or animal production farms. Urban ABLs may be concerned with exchange processes involved with the built environment (e.g., buildings, roads, vehicles, etc.). Industrial ABLs may be concerned with exchange processes over mines, power generation, or production facilities. Finally, remote ABLs may be concerned with exchange processes over largely uninhabited lands such as the Arctic, Antarctic, or deserts of the earth. Preference will be given to articles that investigate transport phenomena within the ABL at some level of fundamental and mathematical depth.

Dr. Amir A. Aliabadi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • atmospheric boundary layer
  • transport phenomena
  • analytical methods
  • experimental methods
  • numerical methods
  • rural, agricultural, urban, industrial, or remote environments

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A CFD Approach for Risk Assessment Based on Airborne Pathogen Transmission
Atmosphere 2021, 12(8), 986; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12080986 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 851
Abstract
The outbreak of COVID-19 necessitates developing reliable tools to derive safety measures, including safe social distance and minimum exposure time under different circumstances. Transient Eulerian–Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have emerged as a viably fast and economical option. Nonetheless, these CFD models [...] Read more.
The outbreak of COVID-19 necessitates developing reliable tools to derive safety measures, including safe social distance and minimum exposure time under different circumstances. Transient Eulerian–Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have emerged as a viably fast and economical option. Nonetheless, these CFD models resolve the instantaneous distribution of droplets inside a computational domain, making them incapable of directly being used to assess the risk of infection as it depends on the total accumulated dosage of infecting viruses received by a new host within an exposure time. This study proposes a novel risk assessment model (RAM) to predict the temporal and spatial accumulative concentration of infectious exhaled droplets based on the bio-source’s exhalation profile and droplet distribution using the CFD results of respiratory events in various environmental conditions. Unlike the traditional approach in the bulk movement assessment of droplets’ outreach in a domain, every single droplet is traced inside the domain at each time step, and the total number of droplets passing through any arbitrary position of the domain is determined using a computational code. The performance of RAM is investigated for a series of case studies against various respiratory events where the horizontal and the lateral spread of risky zones are shown to temporarily vary rather than being fixed in space. The sensitivity of risky zones to ambient temperature and relative humidity was also addressed for sample cough and sneeze cases. This implies that the RAM provides crucial information required for defining safety measures such as safety distances or minimum exposure times in different environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transport Phenomena in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer)
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Article
How Much Building Renewable Energy Is Enough? The Vertical City Weather Generator (VCWG v1.4.4)
Atmosphere 2021, 12(7), 882; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12070882 - 07 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 686
Abstract
A challenge in the integration of renewable and alternative energy systems for buildings is the determination of the renewable energy ratio, which involves the selection and sizing of appropriate building systems. To address this need, a micro climate-weather software titled the Vertical City [...] Read more.
A challenge in the integration of renewable and alternative energy systems for buildings is the determination of the renewable energy ratio, which involves the selection and sizing of appropriate building systems. To address this need, a micro climate-weather software titled the Vertical City Weather Generator (VCWG) is further developed to include renewable and alternative energy systems and account for full two-way interaction between the building system and outdoor environment. VCWG is forced to simulate performance of a residential building in Guelph, Canada, for an entire year in 2015. Various energy options are considered and further optimized for the building to reduce natural gas consumption, electricity consumption, and cost. On an annual basis using the global cost method, and compared to a building with no such renewable or alternative energy systems, the optimized system resulted in 80.3% savings in natural gas consumption, 73.4% savings in electricity consumption, and 3% savings is annualized cost. According to this analysis, some technologies, such as photovoltaics are more favorable in the Canadian climate than other technologies. It is suggested that the building optimization process is not unique, and it depends on background climate, optimization weighing factors, and assumptions used in the economic analysis, which require further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transport Phenomena in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer)
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