Special Issue "Magnetic Nanoparticles: Novel Synthesis Methods and Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Raed Abu-Reziq
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry and Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, 91904 Jerusalem, Israel
Interests: nanochemistry; sol-gel chemistry; organometallic chemistry; catalysis; green chemistry; micro- and nanoencapsulation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted tremendous attention owing to their unique chemical and physical properties and because of their potential applications in various fields, such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, biomolecular sensors, bioseparations, magnetothermal therapy, and catalysis. The synthesis pathway of magnetic nanoparticles determines their size, morphology, shape, composition, structure, and magnetic properties. Consequently, special efforts have been devoted to developing different chemical, physical, and biological synthetic methods for preparing magnetic nanoparticles. Synthetic methods such as the sol–gel technique, layer pyrolysis, hydrothermal technique, microwave irradiation, microemulsion co-precipitation, sonolysis, gas phase deposition, electron beam lithography, and bacterial synthesis have been widely used in the preparation magnetic nanoparticles. Recently, various green biosynthetic methods have been applied in the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles using different plant extracts and biomolecules. This Special Issue of Applied Sciences aims to cover the recent advances in developing synthetic methods for the preparation of magnetic nanomaterials and their application.

Prof. Dr. Raed Abu-Reziq
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Synthetic methods
  • Green synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles
  • Magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine
  • Magnetic nanoparticles in catalysis
  • Magnetic separation
  • Functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles
  • Energy materials
  • Environmental applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Magnetically Separable Chiral Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 5960; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10175960 - 28 Aug 2020
Abstract
We describe, for the first time, a successful strategy for synthesizing chiral periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMO NPs). The chiral PMO nanoparticles were synthesized in a sol–gel process under mild conditions; their preparation was mediated by hydrolysis and condensation of chiral-bridged organo-alkoxysilane precursor [...] Read more.
We describe, for the first time, a successful strategy for synthesizing chiral periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMO NPs). The chiral PMO nanoparticles were synthesized in a sol–gel process under mild conditions; their preparation was mediated by hydrolysis and condensation of chiral-bridged organo-alkoxysilane precursor compounds, (OR)3Si-R-Si(OR)3, in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. The resulting nanoparticles were composed merely from a chiral- bridged organo-alkoxysilane monomer. These systems were prepared by applying different surfactants and ligands that finally afforded monodispersed chiral PMO NPs consisting of 100% bridged-organosilane precursor. In addition, the major advancement that was achieved here was, for the first time, success in preparing magnetic chiral PMO NPs. These nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-polymerization of 1,1′-((1R,2R)-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diyl)bis(3-(3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl) urea) chiral monomer by an oil in water (o/w) emulsion process, to afford magnetic chiral PMO NPs with magnetite NPs in their cores. The obtained materials were characterized with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid-state NMR analysis, circular dichroism (CD) analysis, and nitrogen sorption analysis (N2-BET). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles: Novel Synthesis Methods and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Highly Active Ruthenium Catalyst Supported on Magnetically Separable Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 5769; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10175769 - 20 Aug 2020
Abstract
A facile and direct method for synthesizing magnetic periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles from pure organosilane precursors is described. Magnetic ethylene- and phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMO NPs) were prepared by nanoemulsification techniques. For fabricating magnetic ethylene- or phenylene-bridged PMO NPs, hydrophobic magnetic [...] Read more.
A facile and direct method for synthesizing magnetic periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles from pure organosilane precursors is described. Magnetic ethylene- and phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMO NPs) were prepared by nanoemulsification techniques. For fabricating magnetic ethylene- or phenylene-bridged PMO NPs, hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles in an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion were prepared, followed by a sol–gel condensation of the incorporated bridged organosilane precursor (1,2 bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane or 1,4 bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene), respectively. The resulting materials were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid-state NMR analysis, and nitrogen sorption analysis (N2-BET). The magnetic ethylene-bridged PMO NPs were successfully loaded using a ruthenium oxide catalyst by means of sonication and evaporation under mild conditions. The obtained catalytic system, termed [email protected] NPS, was applied in a reduction reaction of aromatic compounds. It exhibited very high catalytic behavior with easy separation from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles: Novel Synthesis Methods and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Conjugation of Urokinase to Water-Soluble Magnetic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Thrombolysis
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(22), 4862; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9224862 - 13 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, covalent conjugation of thrombolytic drug urokinase to water-soluble magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of thrombolysis. Hydrophobic NPs of oleic acid (OA)-coated Fe3O4 are first synthesized and then surface-modified with the amphipathic copolymer poly(maleic [...] Read more.
In this study, covalent conjugation of thrombolytic drug urokinase to water-soluble magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of thrombolysis. Hydrophobic NPs of oleic acid (OA)-coated Fe3O4 are first synthesized and then surface-modified with the amphipathic copolymer poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecylene) (PMAO) to form water-soluble NPs of PMAO-OA-Fe3O4 with monodispersed sizes. PMAO-OA-Fe3O4 NPs display a good water-based stability without aggregation at near neutral pH and show good magnetic separation characteristics. The thrombolytic drug urokinase is then covalently linked with the former product through dehydration condensation reaction between the amino and carboxyl produced by dehydration of the anhydride under N-Ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results show that the [email protected]3O4 NPs are uniformly dispersed in water. The in vitro thrombolytic effect based on the manipulation of magnetic coupling, combined with static and alternating current (AC) magnetic fields, in a mimic blood-vascular system was studied. Drug release test shows that AC magnetic field can be used as switch and accelerator for NPs to release drugs. In addition, thrombolytic efficiency is nearly four times that of pure urokinase. This indicates that the coupling magnetic field may be a promising method to improve thrombolytic effect of the prepared magnetic carrier drug conjugates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticles: Novel Synthesis Methods and Applications)
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