Special Issue "Sports Materials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Thomas Allen

Sports Engineering Research Team, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sports engineering; finite element analysis; material characterization; experimental mechanics; sports injury prevention; sports equipment design; Auxetic materials
Guest Editor
Dr. Leon Foster

Centre for Sports Engineering Research, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Material testing, performance modelling, Auxetic materials
Guest Editor
Dr. Martin Strangwood

School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microstructure-processing-property relationships; strain rate dependence of properties; modeling of materials; characterization
Guest Editor
Dr. James Webster

Under Armour Inc, Baltimore 21230, UK
E-Mail
Interests: material testing; advanced manufacturing; material development; apparel, footwear, accessories and PPE

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world of sport is dominated by materials; they are a key component of every piece of sports equipment, each modern playing surface, as well as clothing, footwear, and safety devices. History has shown that advances in materials have usually gone hand in hand with noticeable performance improvements. Any change or introduction of new materials into elite sport must be closely governed as not to cause too-drastic performance increases and/or be detrimental to the spectacle of the sport. Materials are also making sport and recreational activities safer by improving the performance of safety devices and personal protective equipment (PPE). Along with all these developments, new manufacturing processes and the use of new types of materials have brought down the costs of equipment and making certain sports more accessible to more people.

This Special Issue on "Sports Materials" is dedicated to recent advances in research and development of materials, equipment design, surfaces, apparel and the human body in relation to sport and physical activity. We invite you to submit research articles or reviews on the latest research work in these areas, with emphasis on applications in all areas of science and engineering.

Dr. Thomas Allen
Dr. Leon Foster
Dr. Martin Strangwood
Dr. James Webster
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Instrumentation

  • Testing

  • Performance

  • Protection

  • Modelling

  • Finite element analysis

  • Composite

  • Polymer

  • Equipment

  • Impact

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Low-Velocity Impacts on a Polymeric Foam for the Passive Safety Improvement of Sports Fields: Meshless Approach and Experimental Validation
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(7), 1174; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8071174
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
Over the past few years, foam materials have been increasingly used in the passive safety of sport fields, to mitigate the risk of crash injury. Currently, the passive safety certification process of these materials represents an expensive and time-consuming task, since a considerable
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Over the past few years, foam materials have been increasingly used in the passive safety of sport fields, to mitigate the risk of crash injury. Currently, the passive safety certification process of these materials represents an expensive and time-consuming task, since a considerable number of impact tests on material samples have to be carried out by an ad hoc testing apparatus. To overcome this difficulty and speed up the design process of new protective devices, a virtual model for the low-velocity impact behaviour of foam protective mats is needed. In this study a modelling approach based on the mesh-free Element Galerkin method was developed to investigate the impact behaviour of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) foam protective mats. The main advantage of this novel technique is that the difficulties related to the computational mesh distortion and caused by the large deformation of the foam material are avoided and a good accuracy is achieved at a relatively low computational cost. The numerical model was validated statistically by comparing numerical and experimental acceleration data acquired during a series of impact events on EVA foam mats of various thicknesses. The findings of this study are useful for the design and improvement of foam protective devices and allow for optimizing sports fields’ facilities by reducing head injury risk by a reliable computational method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Mechanical Characterisation and Modelling of Elastomeric Shockpads
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040501
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 27 March 2018
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Abstract
Third generation artificial turf systems are comprised of a range of polymeric and elastomeric materials that exhibit non-linear and strain rate dependent behaviours under the complex loads applied from players and equipment. An elastomeric shockpad is often included beneath the carpet layer to
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Third generation artificial turf systems are comprised of a range of polymeric and elastomeric materials that exhibit non-linear and strain rate dependent behaviours under the complex loads applied from players and equipment. An elastomeric shockpad is often included beneath the carpet layer to aid in the absorption of impact forces. The purpose of this study was to characterise the behaviour of two elastomeric shockpads and find a suitable material model to represent them in finite element simulations. To characterise the behaviour of the shockpads an Advanced Artificial Athlete test device was used to gather stress-strain data from different drop heights (15, 35 and 55 mm). The experimental results from both shockpads showed a hyperelastic material response with viscoelasticity. Microfoam material models were found to describe the material behaviour of the shockpads and were calibrated using the 55 mm drop height experimental data. The material model for each shockpad was verified through finite element simulations of the Advanced Artificial Athlete impact from different drop heights (35 and 15 mm). Finite element model accuracy was assessed through the comparison of a series of key variables including shock absorption, energy restitution, vertical deformation and contact time. Both shockpad models produced results with a mean error of less than 10% compared to experimental data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Implications of Rigid Gripping Constraints on Clubhead Dynamics in Steel Golf Shafts
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8030422
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
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Abstract
Research and equipment testing with golf robots offers much greater control and manipulation of experimental variables compared to tests using human golfers. However, whilst it is acknowledged that the club gripping mechanism of a robot is dissimilar to that of a human, there
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Research and equipment testing with golf robots offers much greater control and manipulation of experimental variables compared to tests using human golfers. However, whilst it is acknowledged that the club gripping mechanism of a robot is dissimilar to that of a human, there appears to be no scientific findings on the effects of these gripping differences on the clubhead at ball impact. Theoretical and experimental strain propagation rates from the clubhead to the grip and back to the clubhead were determined during robot testing with a 9-iron to determine if this time interval was sufficiently short to permit the gripping mechanism to have an effect on the clubhead during impact. Longitudinal strain appears to propagate the most quickly, but such deflections are likely to be small and therefore of little meaningful consequence. Shaft bending was not a primary concern as modes of large enough amplitude appear to propagate too slowly to be relevant. Torsional strain propagates at a rate which suggests that constraints at the grip end of a golf club could potentially influence impact dynamics for steel shafted irons; however, this effect seems unlikely to be significant, a likelihood that decreases further for longer irons. As such, it is considered reasonable to treat the influence of a robot’s gripping mechanism on clubhead dynamics at impact as negligible, and therefore comparisons between robot and human data in this regard are valid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Measurement of Strain and Strain Rate during the Impact of Tennis Ball Cores
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8030371
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 1 March 2018 / Published: 4 March 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to establish the strains and strain rates experienced by tennis ball cores during impact to inform material characterisation testing and finite element modelling. Three-dimensional surface strains and strain rates were measured using two high-speed video cameras and
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The aim of this investigation was to establish the strains and strain rates experienced by tennis ball cores during impact to inform material characterisation testing and finite element modelling. Three-dimensional surface strains and strain rates were measured using two high-speed video cameras and corresponding digital image correlation software (GOM Correlate Professional). The results suggest that material characterisation testing to a maximum strain of 0.4 and a maximum rate of 500 s−1 in tension and to a maximum strain of −0.4 and a maximum rate of −800 s−1 in compression would encapsulate the demands placed on the material during impact and, in turn, define the range of properties required to encapsulate the behavior of the material during impact, enabling testing to be application-specific and strain-rate-dependent properties to be established and incorporated in finite element models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Application of Auxetic Foam in Sports Helmets
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 354; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8030354
Received: 18 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
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Abstract
This investigation explored the viability of using open cell polyurethane auxetic foams to augment the conformable layer in a sports helmet and improve its linear impact acceleration attenuation. Foam types were compared by examining the impact severity on an instrumented anthropomorphic headform within
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This investigation explored the viability of using open cell polyurethane auxetic foams to augment the conformable layer in a sports helmet and improve its linear impact acceleration attenuation. Foam types were compared by examining the impact severity on an instrumented anthropomorphic headform within a helmet consisting of three layers: a rigid shell, a stiff closed cell foam, and an open cell foam as a conformable layer. Auxetic and conventional foams were interchanged to act as the helmet’s conformable component. Attenuation of linear acceleration was examined by dropping the combined helmet and headform on the front and the side. The helmet with auxetic foam reduced peak linear accelerations (p < 0.05) relative to its conventional counterpart at the highest impact energy in both orientations. Gadd Severity Index reduced by 11% for frontal impacts (38.9 J) and 44% for side impacts (24.3 J). The conformable layer within a helmet can influence the overall impact attenuating properties. The helmet fitted with auxetic foam can attenuate impact severity more than when fitted with conventional foam, and warrants further investigation for its potential to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injuries in sport specific impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Functional Elastic Knits Made of Bamboo Charcoal and Quick-Dry Yarns: Manufacturing Techniques and Property Evaluations
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(12), 1287; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7121287
Received: 2 October 2017 / Revised: 29 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
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Abstract
Conventional sportswear fabrics are functional textiles that can mitigate the impaired muscles caused by exercises for the wearers, but they can also cause discomfort and skin allergy. This study proposes combining two yarns to form functional composite yarns, by using a twisting or
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Conventional sportswear fabrics are functional textiles that can mitigate the impaired muscles caused by exercises for the wearers, but they can also cause discomfort and skin allergy. This study proposes combining two yarns to form functional composite yarns, by using a twisting or wrapping process. Moreover, a different twist number is used in order to adjust the performance of functional composite yarns. A crochet machine is used to make the functional composite yarns into functional elastic knits that are suitable for use in sportswear. The test results show that, in comparison to the non-processed yarns, using the twisted or wrapped yarns can considerably decrease the water vapor transmission rate of functional elastic knits by 38%, while also improving their far infrared emissivity by 13%, water absorption rate by 39%, and air permeability by 136%. In particular, the functional elastic knits that are made of B-wrapped yarns (bamboo charcoal- wrapped yarns), composed of 20 twists per inch, have the optimal diverse functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Review of Auxetic Materials for Sports Applications: Expanding Options in Comfort and Protection
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 941; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8060941
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 31 May 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3386 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Following high profile, life changing long term mental illnesses and fatalities in sports such as skiing, cricket and American football—sports injuries feature regularly in national and international news. A mismatch between equipment certification tests, user expectations and infield falls and collisions is thought
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Following high profile, life changing long term mental illnesses and fatalities in sports such as skiing, cricket and American football—sports injuries feature regularly in national and international news. A mismatch between equipment certification tests, user expectations and infield falls and collisions is thought to affect risk perception, increasing the prevalence and severity of injuries. Auxetic foams, structures and textiles have been suggested for application to sporting goods, particularly protective equipment, due to their unique form-fitting deformation and curvature, high energy absorption and high indentation resistance. The purpose of this critical review is to communicate how auxetics could be useful to sports equipment (with a focus on injury prevention), and clearly lay out the steps required to realise their expected benefits. Initial overviews of auxetic materials and sporting protective equipment are followed by a description of common auxetic materials and structures, and how to produce them in foams, textiles and Additively Manufactured structures. Beneficial characteristics, limitations and commercial prospects are discussed, leading to a consideration of possible further work required to realise potential uses (such as in personal protective equipment and highly conformable garments). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Materials)
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