Special Issue "Recent Applications of Smartphone and Smart Glasses in Applied Science and Engineering"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Industrial Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yosoon Choi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 48513, Korea
Interests: smart mining; renewables in mining; space mining; AICBM (AI, IoT, cloud, big data, mobile) convergence; unmanned aerial vehicle; mine planning and design; open-pit mining operation; mine safety; geographic information systems; 3D geo-modeling; geostatistics; hydrological analysis; energy analysis and simulation; design of solar energy conversion systems; renewable energy systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, more than 3.5 billion people use smartphones in the world, and the number is anticipated to continue to grow in the future. Smartphones can be used for various purposes; their versatility ranges from fast processing and portability to connectivity with a number of networks to sensors allowing the measurement of properties of the device itself and the external environment. Furthermore, smartphones are equipped with intuitive software (S/W) distribution systems and thus have significant benefits associated with small costs when applications are developed to replace existing methods or tools.

Smart glasses or smart goggles are optical head-mounted displays that project a virtual image that is visible to the wearer on top of the real-world view. Smart glasses provide both the intrinsic function of glasses for viewing objects in front and the functions of a smartphone. Unlike smartphones, smart glasses have a great advantage of freeing both hands of the worker so that they can focus on the work. Therefore, smart glasses can also be used in various fields, including healthcare, training, logistics, and tourism.

Many applications of smartphone and smart glasses have been developed in the realm of applied science and engineering for purposes of collecting, storing, analyzing, and visualizing various sets of information and data. This Special Issue (SI) aims to encourage scientists, engineers, educators, students, and researchers to address the current state-of-the-art applications of smartphone and smart glasses in applied science and engineering. Original research contributions and reviews showing the improvements brought by smartphone and smart glasses applications in all areas of applied science and engineering can be included in this SI.

Prof. Dr. Yosoon Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smartphone
  • Tablet
  • Mobile device
  • Smart glasses
  • Wearable device
  • Augmented reality
  • Mixed reality
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Internet of Things
  • Human–computer interactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Unified Framework for Automatic Detection of Wound Infection with Artificial Intelligence
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5353; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155353 - 03 Aug 2020
Abstract
Background: The surgical wound is a unique problem requiring continuous postoperative care, and mobile health technology is implemented to bridge the care gap. Our study aim was to design an integrated framework to support the diagnosis of wound infection. Methods: We used a [...] Read more.
Background: The surgical wound is a unique problem requiring continuous postoperative care, and mobile health technology is implemented to bridge the care gap. Our study aim was to design an integrated framework to support the diagnosis of wound infection. Methods: We used a computer-vision approach based on supervised learning techniques and machine learning algorithms, to help detect the wound region of interest (ROI) and classify wound infection features. The intersection-union test (IUT) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the detection of color card and wound ROI. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of our model was adopted in comparison with different machine learning approaches. Results: 480 wound photographs were taken from 100 patients for analysis. The average value of IUT on the validation set with fivefold stratification to detect wound ROI was 0.775. For prediction of wound infection, our model achieved a significantly higher AUC score (83.3%) than the other three methods (kernel support vector machines, 44.4%; random forest, 67.1%; gradient boosting classifier, 66.9%). Conclusions: Our evaluation of a prospectively collected wound database demonstrates the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed system, which has been developed for automatic detection of wound infections in patients undergoing surgical procedures. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of a Wake-Up Task-Based Mobile Alarm App
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 3993; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10113993 - 09 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The latest mobile alarm apps provide wake-up tasks (e.g., solving math problems) to dismiss the alarm, and many users willingly accept such an inconvenience in return for successfully waking up on time. However, there have been no studies that investigate how the wake-up [...] Read more.
The latest mobile alarm apps provide wake-up tasks (e.g., solving math problems) to dismiss the alarm, and many users willingly accept such an inconvenience in return for successfully waking up on time. However, there have been no studies that investigate how the wake-up tasks are used and their effects from a human–computer interaction perspective. This study aims to deepen our understanding of how users engage and utilize the task-based alarm app by (1) examining the characteristics of different wake-up tasks and (2) extracting usage factors of hard tasks which involve physical or cognitive task loads over a certain level. We developed and deployed Alarmy, which is a task-based mobile alarm app with four wake-up task features: touching a button, taking a picture, shaking the device, and solving math problems. We collected 42.9 million in situ usage data from 211,273 US users for five months. Their alarm app usage behaviors were measured in two folds: eight alarm-set variables and five alarm-dismiss variables. Our statistical test results reveal the significant differences in alarm usage behaviors depending on the wake-up task, and the multiple regression analysis results show key usage patterns that affect the frequent uses of hard tasks, which are late alarm hours, many snoozes, and relatively more use on weekends. Our study results provide theoretical implications on behavior change as well as practical implications for designing task-based mobile alarm. Full article
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