Special Issue "Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Tobias Schätz
Website
Guest Editor
Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg, Germany
Interests: quantum simulations with ions and scalability; optical ion trapping; ultracold ion–atom interactions
Prof. Vladan Vuletic
Website
Guest Editor
Lester Wolfe Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Interests: quantum optics; precision measurements; cavity QED; structural phases of ions in optical potentials
Prof. Michael Drewsen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Nordre Ringgade 1, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Interests: ion traps; quantum computers; quantum optics; lasers; molecular physics
Prof. Jonathan Home
Website
Guest Editor
Experimental Quantum Optics and Photonics, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich
Interests: quantum computation and simulations; investigations of quantum state engineering, simulation and information processing with trapped atomic ions
Dr. Leon Karpa
Website
Guest Editor
Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg, Germany
Interests: ion coulomb crystals in optical fields; metrological applications of quantum optics and ions; ultracold ion–atom interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that we announce the upcoming Special Issue of Applied Sciences, “Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects”. The field of optical trapping of atomic particles, both individual ions and atoms as well as ensembles thereof, has seen very rapid progress, giving rise to a rich and diverse spectrum of current and potential applications. It is this issue’s focus to present and highlight these interesting developments. All authors working in this area of research or in related fields are invited to submit their most recent results on the outlined topics for a possible publication in this Special Issue.

The submitted works will be reviewed according to the established standards and peer-review process of Applied Sciences, including the requirement that the presented results be original and unpublished. Submissions may also include review articles treating the topics including, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • Optical traps for ions and Coulomb crystals
  • Ultracold atom-atom and ion–atom interactions in optical traps
  • Hybrid radiofrequency and optical ion traps
  • Nanoscale potentials in ion traps
  • State-selective traps for ions
  • Interaction of ion with optical standing waves and optical potentials
  • Structural phase transitions in ion crystals
  • New approaches to quantum computation and simulations with ions in optical potentials
  • Rydberg excitations in ultracold atomic ensembles

Prof. Tobias Schätz
Prof. Vladan Vuletic
Prof. Michael Drewsen
Prof. Jonathan Home
Dr. Leon Karpa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical traps for ions and Coulomb crystals
  • Ultracold atom-atom and ion–atom interactions in optical traps
  • Hybrid radiofrequency and optical ion traps
  • Nanoscale potentials in ion traps
  • State-selective traps for ions
  • Interaction of ion with optical standing waves and optical potentials
  • Structural phase transitions in ion crystals
  • New approaches to quantum computation and simulations with ions in optical potentials
  • Rydberg excitations in ultracold atomic ensembles

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Thermometry in a Multipole Ion Trap
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5264; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155264 - 30 Jul 2020
Abstract
We present a characterization of the ions’ translational energy distribution in a multipole ion trap. A linear mapping between the energy distribution of the trapped ions onto the ions’ time-of-flight (TOF) to a detector is demonstrated. For low ion temperatures, a deviation from [...] Read more.
We present a characterization of the ions’ translational energy distribution in a multipole ion trap. A linear mapping between the energy distribution of the trapped ions onto the ions’ time-of-flight (TOF) to a detector is demonstrated. For low ion temperatures, a deviation from linearity is observed and can be attributed to the emergence of multiple potential minima. The potential landscape of the trapped ions is modeled via the finite element method, also accounting for subtleties such as surface-charge accumulation. We demonstrate the validity of our thermometry method by simulating the energy distribution of the ion ensemble thermalized with buffer gas using a Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. A comparison between the energy distribution of trapped ions in different multipole trap configurations—i.e., with hyperbolic rods, cylindrical rods, and cylindrical wires—is provided. With these findings, one can map the temperature of the trapped ions down to the Kelvin regime using their TOF distributions. This enables future studies on sympathetic cooling and chemical reactions involving ions in multipole traps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Narrow-Line Laser Cooling and Trapping of Sr Atoms in Microgravity Environments
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 4928; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144928 - 17 Jul 2020
Abstract
Obtaining ultracold alkaline earth(-like) atoms in space encounters the problem of performing narrow-line laser cooling in microgravity environments ( μ -gEs). This paper reports an analysis of the magneto-optical trap (MOT) based on the narrow-line transition in 88 Sr, while paying special attention [...] Read more.
Obtaining ultracold alkaline earth(-like) atoms in space encounters the problem of performing narrow-line laser cooling in microgravity environments ( μ -gEs). This paper reports an analysis of the magneto-optical trap (MOT) based on the narrow-line transition in 88 Sr, while paying special attention to the role of the gravity. This analysis suggests the MOTs based on narrow-line transitions cannot be cold and dense enough in a μ -gE. We thus propose a strategy: that one can use a dual-frequency MOT to realize a low-temperature, high density, and high transfer efficiency, narrow-line red MOT in μ -gEs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessArticle
Vibrational Quenching of Weakly Bound Cold Molecular Ions Immersed in Their Parent Gas
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2371; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072371 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
Hybrid ion–atom systems provide an excellent platform for studies of state-resolved quantum chemistry at low temperatures, where quantum effects may be prevalent. Here we study theoretically the process of vibrational relaxation of an initially weakly bound molecular ion due to collisions with the [...] Read more.
Hybrid ion–atom systems provide an excellent platform for studies of state-resolved quantum chemistry at low temperatures, where quantum effects may be prevalent. Here we study theoretically the process of vibrational relaxation of an initially weakly bound molecular ion due to collisions with the background gas atoms. We show that this inelastic process is governed by the universal long-range part of the interaction potential, which allows for using simplified model potentials applicable to multiple atomic species. The product distribution after the collision can be estimated by making use of the distorted wave Born approximation. We find that the inelastic collisions lead predominantly to small changes in the binding energy of the molecular ion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Electro-Optical Ion Trap for Experiments with Atom-Ion Quantum Hybrid Systems
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2222; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072222 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the development of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics, atom-ion hybrid systems are characterized by the presence of a new tool in the experimental AMO toolbox: atom-ion interactions. One of the main limitations in state-of-the-art atom-ion experiments is represented by the micromotion [...] Read more.
In the development of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics, atom-ion hybrid systems are characterized by the presence of a new tool in the experimental AMO toolbox: atom-ion interactions. One of the main limitations in state-of-the-art atom-ion experiments is represented by the micromotion component of the ions’ dynamics in a Paul trap, as the presence of micromotion in atom-ion collisions results in a heating mechanism that prevents atom-ion mixtures from undergoing a coherent evolution. Here, we report the design and the simulation of a novel ion trapping setup especially conceived of for integration with an ultracold atoms experiment. The ion confinement is realized by using an electro-optical trap based on the combination of an optical and an electrostatic field, so that no micromotion component will be present in the ions’ dynamics. The confining optical field is generated by a deep optical lattice created at the crossing of a bow-tie cavity, while a static electric quadrupole ensures the ions’ confinement in the plane orthogonal to the optical lattice. The setup is also equipped with a Paul trap for cooling the ions produced by photoionization of a hot atomic beam, and the design of the two ion traps facilitates the swapping of the ions from the Paul trap to the electro-optical trap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermoelectricity Modeling with Cold Dipole Atoms in Aubry Phase of Optical Lattice
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 2090; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062090 - 19 Mar 2020
Abstract
We study analytically and numerically the thermoelectric properties of a chain of cold atoms with dipole-dipole interactions placed in an optical periodic potential. At small potential amplitudes the chain slides freely that corresponds to the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser phase of integrable curves of a symplectic [...] Read more.
We study analytically and numerically the thermoelectric properties of a chain of cold atoms with dipole-dipole interactions placed in an optical periodic potential. At small potential amplitudes the chain slides freely that corresponds to the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser phase of integrable curves of a symplectic map. Above a certain critical amplitude the chain is pinned by the lattice being in the cantori Aubry phase. We show that the Aubry phase is characterized by exceptional thermoelectric properties with the figure of merit Z T = 25 being 10 times larger than the maximal value reached in material science experiments. We show that this system is well accessible for magneto-dipole cold atom experiments that opens new prospects for investigations of thermoelectricity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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Open AccessArticle
Multiple Current Reversals Using Superimposed Driven Lattices
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041357 - 17 Feb 2020
Abstract
We demonstrate that directed transport of particles in a two dimensional driven lattice can be dynamically reversed multiple times by superimposing additional spatially localized lattices on top of a background lattice. The timescales of such current reversals can be flexibly controlled by adjusting [...] Read more.
We demonstrate that directed transport of particles in a two dimensional driven lattice can be dynamically reversed multiple times by superimposing additional spatially localized lattices on top of a background lattice. The timescales of such current reversals can be flexibly controlled by adjusting the spatial locations of the superimposed lattices. The key principle behind the current reversals is the conversion of the particle dynamics from chaotic to ballistic, which allow the particles to explore regions of the underlying phase space which are inaccessible otherwise. Our results can be experimentally realized using cold atoms in driven optical lattices and allow for the control of transport of atomic ensembles in such setups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Trapping of Ions and Atoms 2020: Novel Advances and Prospects)
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