Special Issue "Noise Barriers"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Marek Pawelczyk
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Measurements and Control Systems, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Computer Science, Silesian University of Science and Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Interests: modeling; optimization; data analysis; modal analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jordan Cheer
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton
Interests: Active noise control; Active vibration control; Loudspeaker arrays; Active acoustic metamaterials; Personal sound zones
Prof. Dr. Nicolaas Bernardus Roozen
Website
Guest Editor
KU Leuven
Interests: noise and vibration control; numerical methods; measurement techniques; material characterisation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our great pleasure to invite you to contribute to this special issue by presenting your results on acoustic noise barriers. The main concern is to protect humans from excessive noise, which may impair the hearing system or may impede concentration and rest. The papers can focus on structural noise control, for instance vibrating panels or full device casings designed to improve passive isolation. Energy of the panels due to acoustic excitation can also be dissipated in a semi-active circuit or they can be forced to vibrate in order to reduce the transmitted noise. Works on the generation of virtual barriers like acoustic curtains are welcome. Techniques for improving the acoustic climate in enclosures are also appreciated. The papers can present modeling, optimization, control, measurements, analysis, and applications.

Prof. Marek Pawelczyk
Dr. Jordan Cheer
Prof. Dr. Nicolaas Bernardus Roozen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active structural acoustic control
  • passive control
  • semi-active and active control
  • virtual barriers
  • device noise control

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Notes on a New Structure of Active Noise Control Systems
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 4705; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144705 - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
The idea of active noise control is an attenuation of unwanted noise with an additionally generated acoustic wave using the phenomenon of interference. Its technical realization employs advanced control algorithms. Active noise control is an area of intense research and practical engineering applications. [...] Read more.
The idea of active noise control is an attenuation of unwanted noise with an additionally generated acoustic wave using the phenomenon of interference. Its technical realization employs advanced control algorithms. Active noise control is an area of intense research and practical engineering applications. In the paper a new structure of adaptive active noise control systems is proposed. Compared with classical control systems used for active noise control, the proposed structure contains in an error signal measurement path an additional discrete-time filter that estimates signal values at the input of this path. These estimates are then used to tune the corresponding adaptive filter. Properties of the proposed adaptive active noise control structure are illustrated by simulation examples in which a feedforward control system equipped with this additional filter is used to attenuate unwanted wide-sense stationary random noises with continuous and mixed spectra. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Barriers)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Soundproofing Materials for Noise Reduction in Dental CAD/CAM Milling Machines
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(8), 2768; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10082768 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
Soundproofing materials are widely used in various fields as a passive measure to reduce noise. Despite this, there have been a few studies on the application of soundproofing materials on medical equipment, which is the main cause of noise in a medical environment. [...] Read more.
Soundproofing materials are widely used in various fields as a passive measure to reduce noise. Despite this, there have been a few studies on the application of soundproofing materials on medical equipment, which is the main cause of noise in a medical environment. Despite the increasing number of studies on active noise control for the noise reduction of machines, it is difficult to apply customized noise control—i.e., specific control measures according to the various characteristics of that noise—due to its high cost and low effectiveness. Therefore, research on passive noise control using soundproofing materials is required for effective noise control. The 3D CAD/CAM milling machine, which is an essential device in the digitalized dental environment, is causing various problems as a new noise source. This study investigated the noise of the milling machine and considered its characteristics in application of an efficient soundproofing material for noise reduction. Additionally, a soundproofing material performance test was conducted to select an appropriate soundproofing material based on the noise characteristics of the milling machine. As milling machines cause noise issues in hospitals, the study results were analyzed in considering practical aspects for immediate application to actual sale products. This study suggests that the application of Thinsulator and a triple soundproofing mat (butyl 100% + aluminum + sound-insulating material) is effective in the noise reduction of milling machines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Barriers)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Control of Low-Frequency Audible Noise from Electrical Substations: A Case Study
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020637 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
With the world facing the urgency of energy transition, the development of efficient and quiet electrical infrastructures is of topical importance in the construction of the environment of the future. The problem of noise from power distribution systems is often underestimated, although several [...] Read more.
With the world facing the urgency of energy transition, the development of efficient and quiet electrical infrastructures is of topical importance in the construction of the environment of the future. The problem of noise from power distribution systems is often underestimated, although several works in the literature underline the effect of disturbance on the population, especially concerning the low frequency range. This paper overviews the issue of the low-frequency noise generated by electrical substations, from the experimental characterization of the source to the possible mitigation measures at the source, along the propagation path and at the receiver. Alongside the general presentation, a case study serves as a practical demonstration of the proposed methodological approach. It was found that in the investigated situation the main disturbance comes from the transformer at two low-frequency harmonics of twice the networking frequency. A traditional noise barrier is designed taking into account the strict size constraints imposed by technical compatibility with the electrical infrastructure, which limits its efficacy at low frequency. Noise masking with broadband signals can be a complementary solution to further reduce noise disturbance and contain it within prescribed limits. The evaluation of subjective response of the receivers to different mitigation solutions is made possible by the availability of the impulse response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Barriers)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance Evaluation of Active Noise Control for a Real Device Casing
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010377 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
Reduction of noise generated by devices is an important problem, both in industrial environments where high sound pressure levels may damage hearing, and in households where the sound pressure level is usually moderate, but may cause discomfort and stress. Classically used passive methods [...] Read more.
Reduction of noise generated by devices is an important problem, both in industrial environments where high sound pressure levels may damage hearing, and in households where the sound pressure level is usually moderate, but may cause discomfort and stress. Classically used passive methods often have poor performance for low frequencies. Alternatively, active control can be used to improve noise reduction in this frequency range. In the proposed approach, noise generated by devices may be reduced by controlling vibrations of the casing. The authors previously confirmed the performance of the proposed active control approach using a dedicated noise-canceling casing. Herein, we describe further development and application of the method to an off-the-shelf washing machine. Electrodynamic actuators were installed on four walls of the washing machine. The performance of the control systems was experimentally evaluated during the real spinning phase and the results are reported here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Barriers)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Comparative Study of Sound Transmission Losses of Sandwich Composite Double Panel Walls
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041543 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The increasing motivation behind the recently wide industrial applications of sandwich and composite double panel structures stems from their ability to absorb sounds more effectively. Meticulous selection of the geometrical and material constituents of both the core and panels of these structures can [...] Read more.
The increasing motivation behind the recently wide industrial applications of sandwich and composite double panel structures stems from their ability to absorb sounds more effectively. Meticulous selection of the geometrical and material constituents of both the core and panels of these structures can produce highly desirable properties. A good understanding of their vibro-acoustic response and emission index such as the sound transmission loss (STL) is, therefore, a requisite to producing optimal design. In this study, an overview of recent advances in STL of sandwich and composites double panels is presented. At first, some salient explanation of the various frequency and controlled regions are given. It then critically examines a number of parameter effects on the STL of sandwich and composite structures. Literatures on the numerical, analytical and experimental solutions of STL are systematically presented. Efficient and more reliable optimization problems that maximize the STL and minimize the objective functions capable of degrading the effectiveness of the structure to absorb sounds are also provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Barriers)
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