Special Issue "Modern Applications in Optics and Photonics: From Micro- and Nanooptics to Optical Sensing, Measurement and Communication"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 May 2022) | Viewed by 4034
Related Special Issue: Modern Applications in Optics and Photonics: From Sensing and Analytics to Communication

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wilhelm Roth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hannover Centre for Optical Technologies (HOT), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität, 30167 Hannover, Germany
Interests: laser sensing and spectroscopy; integrated polymer optics; fiber-optical sensing; optical technology for illumination, information, and the life sciences; digital holography; fiber couplers; multi-physics optical simulations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Axel Günther
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for High Frequency Technology (IHF), Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
Interests: integrated photonics; polymer optics; optical sensing and metrology; coupling structures; optical simulations; excimer laser technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optics and photonics are among the key technologies of our time and offer the potential for novel applications in areas as diverse as optical measurement, sensing and analytics, monitoring, biomedical imaging, and diagnostics, as well as communication technology, to name some of the most prominent ones. These applications demand a high degree of control over the light fields and benefit significantly from concepts based on micro- and nanooptics and integration technology. The new capabilities lead to novel optical systems with enhanced functionality and unprecedented sensitivity and specificity, which are attractive for a wide range of applications previously not accessible. This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent development and exciting application areas in optics and photonics, indicating the broad multifaceted potential for the future. Articles covering novel optical concepts and systems as well as insights achieved in applications are invited.

Individual topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Integrated micro- and nano-optic concepts and devices
  • Wearable optics
  • Printed optics
  • Biosensors 
  • Surface plasmon resonance sensors
  • Optofluidic measurement
  • Distributed sensing
  • Fiber optic systems and sensing
  • Optical analytics, metrology, and spectroscopy
  • Medical diagnostics, imaging, and monitoring
  • Optical communication systems and technology

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wilhelm Roth
Dr. Axel Günther
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micro- and nanooptics manufacturing, validation, and application
  • integrated optics
  • printed optics
  • biosensing
  • optofluidics
  • optical analytics
  • medical imaging and diagnostics
  • optical communication
  • fiber optical sensing
  • distributed sensing
  • novel optics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Thinfilm Hybrid Nanostructures: A Perspective to Subcycle Opto-Electronics and Coherent Control
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 4805; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12104805 - 10 May 2022
Viewed by 317
Abstract
In this article we present a theoretical investigation of gold-silica-silver nanostructures and their optical properties with respect to ultrafast electronic applications and coherent control by tailored optical fields. We found a remarkable sensitive behavior to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) of the driving [...] Read more.
In this article we present a theoretical investigation of gold-silica-silver nanostructures and their optical properties with respect to ultrafast electronic applications and coherent control by tailored optical fields. We found a remarkable sensitive behavior to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) of the driving laser pulses in the coupling of surface and bulk plasmons leading to a superposition of distinct modes with a time-dependent amplitude structure. Furthermore, we show a rather complex temporal evolution of plasmonic surface modes. Our results suggest the potential for coherent control of the time-dependent resonant coupling between surface and volume modes by tailored laser pulses and foster the field of time-dependent spectroscopy of thinfilm hybrid nanostructures with single layer thickness down to the two-dimensional limit. Full article
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Article
Mueller Matrix-Based Approach for the Ex Vivo Detection of Riboflavin-Treated Transparent Biotissue
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(23), 11515; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112311515 - 05 Dec 2021
Viewed by 683
Abstract
Corneal collagen cross-linking is an established procedure for the treatment of certain eye diseases which is applied to enhance the mechanical stability of such biotissue without deteriorating its functionality. However, being transparent, the optical analysis of the outcome of such treatments is cumbersome [...] Read more.
Corneal collagen cross-linking is an established procedure for the treatment of certain eye diseases which is applied to enhance the mechanical stability of such biotissue without deteriorating its functionality. However, being transparent, the optical analysis of the outcome of such treatments is cumbersome and relies on relatively expensive experimental equipment. We aim to apply the Mueller matrix polarimetry for the detection of photo-induced collagen cross-linking in transparent biotissue after treatment with riboflavin and UV irradiation. A simple Mueller matrix polarimetry setup could provide a fast and non-invasive analysis of transparent media to sensitively detect small photo-induced cross-linking effects in biotissue. We demonstrated the current capabilities of the approach on non-planar porcine cornea samples ex vivo. We reported the distinction between untreated and riboflavin-treated samples. The differences observed were correlated with the variation of certain Mueller matrix elements and parameters derived from the decomposition. The measurement data show variation in the cross-linked and non-cross-linked samples, although the effect of the UV treatment on the riboflavin-treated samples was not at the same level of significance yet and needs further investigation. The Mueller matrix measurement represents a promising approach for the detection of the effects of corneal collagen cross-linking. Further studies with a larger sample number are required to validate this approach. In the future, this could enable the reliable and non-invasive detection of photo-induced effects in biotissue and open the possibility for in vivo application, e.g., in eye disease treatment or the detection of scar collagen development. Full article
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Article
Simulation and Experimental Verification of the Thermal Behaviour of Self-Written Waveguides
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(17), 7881; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11177881 - 26 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 458
Abstract
In this work, we investigated the optical response of a self-written waveguide (SWW) in detail by heating the structure from room temperature up to 60 °C. Previous results indicated a decrease in the optical transmission with increasing temperature for certain waveguide parameters. Based [...] Read more.
In this work, we investigated the optical response of a self-written waveguide (SWW) in detail by heating the structure from room temperature up to 60 °C. Previous results indicated a decrease in the optical transmission with increasing temperature for certain waveguide parameters. Based on new experimental measurements, we have identified material parameters resulting in opposite behaviour. An experimental setup was conceived to verify these results. Hereby, we were able to show that we can adjust material parameters such as refractive index and the corresponding density of the material by adapting the curing time applied during the fabrication of the waveguides. This, in turn, affects the material’s response during the heating process. We showed that a limitation of the external curing time changes the internal conditions of the SWW and the cladding in a manner that the numerical aperture increases with the temperature, which subsequently also results in an increase in the optical transmission. In this study, we explain this unexpected behavior of the SWW and point towards possible future applications. Full article
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Article
Improving the Contrast of Pseudothermal Ghost Images Based on the Measured Signal Distribution of Speckle Fields
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 2621; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11062621 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 746
Abstract
In this study, we examine the quality of microscale ghost images as a function of the measured histographic signal distribution of the speckle fields from a nonuniform pseudothermal light source. This research shows that the distribution of the detected signal level on each [...] Read more.
In this study, we examine the quality of microscale ghost images as a function of the measured histographic signal distribution of the speckle fields from a nonuniform pseudothermal light source. This research shows that the distribution of the detected signal level on each pixel of the camera plays a significant role in improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of pseudothermal ghost imaging. To our knowledge, the scaling of CNR with different pixel intensity distributions of the speckle fields is observed for the first time in the field of pseudothermal microscale ghost imaging. The experimental observations are in very good agreement with numerical analysis. Based on these findings, we can predict the settings for light sources that will maximize the CNR of microscale ghost images. Full article
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Article
Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Internal Temperature of an Oil-Immersed Power Transformer with DOFS
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5718; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165718 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 837
Abstract
To accurately detect and monitor the internal temperature of an operating power transformer, the distributed optical fiber sensor (DOFS) was creatively applied inside an oil-immersed 35 kV transformer through high integration with the winding wire. On the former basis, the power transformer prototype [...] Read more.
To accurately detect and monitor the internal temperature of an operating power transformer, the distributed optical fiber sensor (DOFS) was creatively applied inside an oil-immersed 35 kV transformer through high integration with the winding wire. On the former basis, the power transformer prototype with a completely global internal temperature sensing capability was successfully developed and it was also qualified for power grid operation through the ex-factory type tests. The internal spatially continuous temperature distribution of the operating transformer was then revealed through a heat-run test and the numerical simulation was also applied for further analysis. Hotspots of windings were continuously located and monitored (emerging at about 89%/90% height of low/high voltage winding), which were furtherly compared with the IEC calculation results. This new nondestructive internal sensing method shows a broad application prospect in the electrical equipment field. Also, the revelation of transformer internal distributed temperature can offer a solid reference for both researchers and field operation staff. Full article
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