Special Issue "Assessment of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Properties"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Chao-Wei Tang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering & Geomatics, Cheng Shiu University
Interests: concrete materials; lightweight aggregate concrete; neural networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber-reinforced concrete mainly uses fiber to improve the properties of reinforced concrete, such as tensile strength, deformability, and dynamic load resistance. In order to reduce cracks in concrete (due to shrinkage or autogenous shrinkage) and to increase tensile ductility and fire resistance, many different types of fibers have been developed for the market and have been widely used in various construction projects. Many scholars have developed a blend of different types of fibers to obtain better concrete engineering properties, such as enhanced toughness, as well as to solve problems caused by the high fiber content of traditional fiber concrete. For example, the amount of added fiber can be varied to optimize the bond relationship between the paste and the fiber, such that it can exhibit steel-like strain-hardening behavior when subjected to direct tension. This cementitious composite, with tensile strain hardening, is called high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (HPFRC).

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences, “Assessment of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Properties”, is intended for a wide and interdisciplinary audience, and covers recent advances in:

  • Innovative concepts to improve the mechanical properties of HPFRC;
  • Developments of new fiber technology to improve the performance of HPFRC;
  • Engineering applications of HPFRC;
  • Reduction of the negative impact of fiber on certain properties of concrete;
  • Mix design of HPFRC;
  • Bond behavior of HPFRC;
  • Thermal properties and fire behavior of HPFRC;
  • Durability of HPFRC.

For this Special Issue, authoritative review articles and original research papers on HPFRC regarding the latest findings related to material properties and structural implications of civil and architectural applications are welcome.

Prof. Chao-Wei Tang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mix design
  • crack formation and propagation
  • fracture energy
  • compressive strength
  • modulus of elasticity
  • stress–strain behavior
  • tensile strength
  • flexural strength
  • drying shrinkage
  • creep
  • electrical resistance
  • fire behavior
  • chloride migration resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Behavior of Mass Concrete with the Addition of Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) When Exposed to Fire
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010117 - 22 Dec 2019
Abstract
Due to the importance of concrete as a structural material and the pathologies that can be achieved by reinforced concrete structures when they are subjected to the action of fire both at the level of resistance and deformation, in this research we study [...] Read more.
Due to the importance of concrete as a structural material and the pathologies that can be achieved by reinforced concrete structures when they are subjected to the action of fire both at the level of resistance and deformation, in this research we study the mechanical behavior of mass concrete with the addition of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) when exposed to the action of fire, in order to determine the improvements that this type of addition produces in concrete. To achieve this objective, compression break tests have been carried out on cylindrical concrete specimens incorporating CNFs. From the analysis of results, it can be concluded that the residual resistant capacity of concrete with the addition of 1% of CNFs by weight of cement subjected to the direct action of fire, is greater than that of concrete without additions, not obtaining better results, if the addition of CNFs increases to 2%. The addition of 1% of CNFs has not influenced the temperatures reached in the concrete, but produces a more homogeneous cooling and that the paste-aggregate bond is maintained despite thermal aggression, which decreases the spalling effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Properties)
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Open AccessArticle
Shear Load-Displacement Curves of PVA Fiber-Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite Expansion Joints in Steel Bridges
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5275; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245275 - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
The concrete in the transition strips of expansion joints can become damaged prematurely during the service period. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber-reinforced engineered cementitious composite (ECC) is a kind of high ductility concrete material, and its ultimate uniaxial tensile strain is more than 3%. [...] Read more.
The concrete in the transition strips of expansion joints can become damaged prematurely during the service period. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber-reinforced engineered cementitious composite (ECC) is a kind of high ductility concrete material, and its ultimate uniaxial tensile strain is more than 3%. It can be used to improve the damage status of expansion joints. Based on previous research results, ECCs were used in the pilot project of bridge expansion joints. Under this engineering background, the shear load-displacement curves of ECC expansion joints were studied through 27 groups of compression-shear tests of ECC/steel composite structures. The shear failure characteristics of ECC expansion joints were analyzed by the digital image correlation method. A shear load-displacement curve model of the composite structures was proposed based on the equivalent strain assumption and Weibull distribution theory. The results show that the failure mode of the composite structure specimens was ECC shear cracking. Stress and strain field nephograms were used to explain the failure characteristics of the composite structure specimens. The calculated curves of the shear load-displacement model of the composite structures were in good agreement with the experimental curves. The work is of great importance to the shear design of ECC expansion joints and their further engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Properties)
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