Special Issue "Advances in Skeletal Muscle"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 2385

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Iori Sakakibara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Medical Nutrition, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima 7708503, Japan
Interests: skeletal muscle; epigenome; transcription
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Shinichiro Hayashi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neuromuscular Research, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo 187-8502, Japan
Interests: skeletal muscle; satellite cell; transcription factor
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to a Special Issue of the journal Applied Sciences, “Advances in Skeletal Muscle”, which aims to present recent advancements of epigenome analysis in the field of skeletal muscle.

Skeletal muscle is essential for the movement of organisms. Loss of muscle mass and function due to aging, cachexia or genetic diseases decreases health-related quality of life. Today, interest in muscle research is increasing with the growth of the elderly population, and it is important to study muscles from various points of view, such as development, metabolism, physiology, and pathology. The epigenome provides a basis of transcription via chemical modification of DNA and histones and acts as a cellular memory, regulating a wide range of organism activity. Several applications have already been developed for epigenetic analysis, such as ChIP-seq, ATAC-seq, mass-spectrometry, and epigenome editing. These tools are also applicable to skeletal muscles with appropriate adaptation to skeletal muscle traits.

We thus invite you to submit your research on these topics, in the form of original research papers, mini-reviews, and perspective articles.

Dr. Iori Sakakibara
Dr. Shinichiro Hayashi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Skeletal muscle
  • Myogenesis
  • Epigenome
  • DNA methylation
  • Histone acetylation
  • Histone methylation
  • Sarcopenia
  • Exercise
  • Cachexia
  • Transcription
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Muscle hypertrophy
  • Satellite cell

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Quantitative Proteome Analysis in Response to Glucose Concentration in C2C12 Myotubes
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(3), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031553 - 31 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Glucose is important for the maintenance of muscle function; however, it is still unclear how changes in glucose concentration affect muscle. Here, we analyzed the effect of glucose concentration on protein expression under different glucose concentration media in C2C12 myotubes. First, we performed [...] Read more.
Glucose is important for the maintenance of muscle function; however, it is still unclear how changes in glucose concentration affect muscle. Here, we analyzed the effect of glucose concentration on protein expression under different glucose concentration media in C2C12 myotubes. First, we performed proteome analysis in C2C12 myotubes cultured in Low (1.0 g/L), Medium (2.0 g/L), and High (4.5 g/L) glucose media. Proteome analysis revealed 113 proteins were significantly changed in group cultured in Low or Medium glucose media compared to group cultured in High glucose media. Furthermore, glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism were increased in the Medium and Low groups. Among these pathways, HK2, PFKP, NDUFA11, and FABP3 were especially upregulated proteins in Low and Medium groups. In this context, ATP production in C2C12 myotubes cultured in Low and Medium glucose media was increased. There was no significant change in myotubes morphology and myogenic differentiation factors in all groups. Finally, we examined the effect on glucose concentration in culture media on myosin isoforms expression by qRT-PCR. As a result, Myh2 and Myh4 were significantly increased in Low and Medium conditions. Altogether, Low and Medium glucose conditions induced Myh expression probably via enhancement glucose utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skeletal Muscle)
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Article
Transcriptome Analyses of In Vitro Exercise Models by Clenbuterol Supplementation or Electrical Pulse Stimulation
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10436; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110436 - 06 Nov 2021
Viewed by 567
Abstract
Exercise has beneficial effects on human health and is affected by two different pathways; motoneuron and endocrine. For the advancement of exercise research, in vitro exercise models are essential. We established two in vitro exercise models using C2C12 myotubes; EPS (electrical pulse stimulation) [...] Read more.
Exercise has beneficial effects on human health and is affected by two different pathways; motoneuron and endocrine. For the advancement of exercise research, in vitro exercise models are essential. We established two in vitro exercise models using C2C12 myotubes; EPS (electrical pulse stimulation) for a motoneuron model and clenbuterol, a specific β2 adrenergic receptor agonist, treatment for an endocrine model. For clenbuterol treatment, we found that Ppargc1a was induced only in low glucose media (1 mg/mL) using a 1-h treatment of 30 ng/mL clenbuterol. Global transcriptional changes of clenbuterol treatment were analyzed by RNA-seq and gene ontology analyses and indicated that mitogenesis and the PI3K-Akt pathway were enhanced, which is consistent with the effects of exercise. Cxcl1 and Cxcl5 were identified as candidate myokines induced by adrenaline. As for the EPS model, we compared 1 Hz of 1-pulse EPS and 1 Hz of 10-pulse EPS for 24 h and determined Myh gene expressions. Ten-pulse EPS induced higher Myh2 and Myh7 expression. Global transcriptional changes of 10-pulse EPS were also analyzed using RNA-seq, and gene ontology analyses indicated that CaMK signaling and hypertrophy pathways were enhanced, which is also consistent with the effects of exercise. In this paper, we provided two transcriptome results of in vitro exercise models and these databases will contribute to advances in exercise research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skeletal Muscle)
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Review

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Review
Histone Modification: A Mechanism for Regulating Skeletal Muscle Characteristics and Adaptive Changes
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 3905; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11093905 - 26 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 574
Abstract
Epigenetics is getting increased attention in the analysis of skeletal muscle adaptation to physiological stimuli. In this review, histone modifications in skeletal muscles and their role in the regulation of muscle characteristics and adaptive changes are highlighted. The distribution of active histone modifications, [...] Read more.
Epigenetics is getting increased attention in the analysis of skeletal muscle adaptation to physiological stimuli. In this review, histone modifications in skeletal muscles and their role in the regulation of muscle characteristics and adaptive changes are highlighted. The distribution of active histone modifications, such as H3K4me3 and H3 acetylation, largely differs between fast- and slow-twitch muscles. It is also indicated that the transcriptional activity in response to exercise differs in these muscle types. Histone turnover activated by exercise training leads to loosening of nucleosomes, which drastically enhances gene responsiveness to exercise, indicating that the exercise training transforms the chromatin structure to an active status. Furthermore, histone modifications play a critical role in preserving the stem cell lineage in skeletal muscle. Lack of lysine-specific demethylase 1 in satellite cells promotes the differentiation into brown adipocytes during muscle regeneration after injury. H4K20me2, which promotes the formation of heterochromatin, is necessary to repress MyoD expression in the satellite cells. These observations indicate that histone modification is a platform that characterizes skeletal muscles and may be one of the factors regulating the range of adaptive changes in these muscles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skeletal Muscle)
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