Special Issue "Biomass Energy and Biomass as a Clean Renewable Fuel"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. João Carlos de Oliveira Matias
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Guest Editor
GOVCOPP Research Unit; Department of Economics, Management, Industrial Engineering and Tourism (DEGEIT), University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Tel. +351 234 370 361 (ext: 23623)
Interests: sustainability; industrial engineering and management; sustainable energy systems; sustainable management systems (quality, maintenance, occupational health and safety); sustainable and lean production; circular economy; technological Innovation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Leonel Nunes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Management, Industrial Engineering and Tourism (DEGEIT),University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: biomass; biomass energy; biomass supply chains; biomass conversion technologies; sustainability and circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The long-term transformation of the energy industry, from fossil to sustainable energy sources, is one of the central challenges of the 21st century. Such a transition requires many changes on a technical and organizational level. The successful implementation of the energy transition requires not only sufficient generation capacity from renewable energies, but also an efficient, intelligent, decentralized, and secure infrastructure for the distribution, storage, and use of electricity and heat. The resulting change in the energy industry poses major challenges for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in particular. On the one hand, this creates great opportunities for the development of new business models, products, and processes; on the other hand, a stronger networking of decentralized system components also entails risks, which are due in particular to the increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) and the automation of processes. The goal must therefore be to create solutions for a sustainable energy system that is economically, environmentally, and socially viable, while meeting high security requirements.

This Special Issue will focus on sustainable energy systems. On the one hand, several innovative and alternative concepts could be presented, but also the topics of energy policy, circular economy, life cycle assessment and supply chain could play a major role. Models on various temporal and geographical scales could be developed to understand the conditions of technical, as well as organizational change. New methods of modeling, which can fulfil technical and physical boundary conditions and nevertheless consider economic environmental and social aspects, could be developed.

Prof. Dr. João Carlos de Oliveira Matias
Prof. Dr. Leonel Nunes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomass energy
  • New business models
  • Biomass conversion technologies
  • New biomass processes
  • New biomass products
  • Biomass supply chains
  • Sustainable biomass energy systems
  • Circular economy
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Influences of Temperature and Substrate Particle Content on Granular Sludge Bed Anaerobic Digestion
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010136 - 23 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Influences of temperature (25–35 °C) and substrate particulate content (3.0–9.4 g total suspended solids (TSS)/L) on granular sludge bed anaerobic digestion (AD) were analyzed in lab-scale reactors using manure as a substrate and through modeling. Two particle levels were tested using raw (RF) [...] Read more.
Influences of temperature (25–35 °C) and substrate particulate content (3.0–9.4 g total suspended solids (TSS)/L) on granular sludge bed anaerobic digestion (AD) were analyzed in lab-scale reactors using manure as a substrate and through modeling. Two particle levels were tested using raw (RF) and centrifuged (CF) swine manure slurries, fed into a 1.3-L lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge bed reactor (UASB) at temperatures of 25 °C and 35 °C. Biogas production increased with temperature in both high- and low-particle-content substrates; however, the temperature effect was stronger on high-particle-content substrate. RF and CF produced a comparable amount of biogas at 25 °C, suggesting that biogas at this temperature came mainly from the digestion of small particles and soluble components present in similar quantities in both substrates. At 35 °C, RF showed significantly higher biogas production than CF, which was attributed to increased (temperature-dependent) disintegration of larger solid particulates. Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1) based modeling was carried out by separating particulates into fast and slow disintegrating fractions and introducing temperature-dependent disintegration constants. Simulations gave a better fit for the experimental data than the conventional ADM1 model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Energy and Biomass as a Clean Renewable Fuel)
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Open AccessArticle
Electricity Evaluation and Emission Characteristics of Poultry Litter Co-Combustion Process
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(19), 4116; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9194116 - 01 Oct 2019
Abstract
Electricity generation and emission characteristics during the poultry litter and natural gas co-combustion process has rarely been studied. In this study, a Stirling engine was successfully integrated into the existing lab-scale swirling fluidized bed combustion system in order to further investigate the poultry [...] Read more.
Electricity generation and emission characteristics during the poultry litter and natural gas co-combustion process has rarely been studied. In this study, a Stirling engine was successfully integrated into the existing lab-scale swirling fluidized bed combustion system in order to further investigate the poultry litter and natural gas co-combustion process. Electricity, gaseous emissions, particulate matter (PM), and fly ash composition were analyzed under various operating conditions. Results indicated that the electricity reached 905 W under a water flow rate of 13.1 L/min and an engine head temperature of 584 °C. It was found that excess air (EA) ratios between 0.79 and 1.08 can relatively produce more electricity with lower emissions. At a secondary air (SA) height of 850 mm, secondary air/total air (SA/TA) ratios between 0.22 and 0.44 may significantly reduce NOx and CO emissions. By increasing the mixing ratio (MR), SO2 was reduced while NOx increased at the beginning of co-combustion process but then decreased again. Additionally, PM results were lower than Maryland emissions standards. The fly ash results showed a higher nutrient content (close to 16%). This study shows the possibility of using poultry litter as a sustainable energy source for energy production while emitting lower emissions in the small decentralized combustion system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Energy and Biomass as a Clean Renewable Fuel)
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Open AccessArticle
Environmental Impact Assessment of Banagrass-Based Cellulosic Ethanol Production on Hawaii Island: A Spatial Analysis of Re-Suspended Soil Dust and Carbon Dioxide Emission
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(13), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9132648 - 29 Jun 2019
Abstract
Environmental impacts from the development of banagrass (Pennisetum purpureum)-based ethanol production on Hawaii Island may create air quality problems. Air pollutants considered in this study include re-suspended soil dust (also known as PM2.5 and PM10) and carbon dioxide [...] Read more.
Environmental impacts from the development of banagrass (Pennisetum purpureum)-based ethanol production on Hawaii Island may create air quality problems. Air pollutants considered in this study include re-suspended soil dust (also known as PM2.5 and PM10) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. The resulting pollutant emissions are then compared against the Federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) significant standard for the environmental impact assessment. This study combines GIS and a mathematical computational model to logically and effectively examine potential spatial impacts of ethanol development on air quality on Hawaii Island. This study found that mechanical harvesting of banagrass generates higher dust emission than other agricultural crops. The total PM10 emission of 248.18 tons per year was found statistically equivalent to the PSD significant permitting requirement limit of 250 tons per year (tpy) and thus considered as a major stationary source of fugitive dust pollution. The annual CO2 emission amount of 19,371.72 tons is less than the PSD significant permitting requirement of 75,000 tons of CO2 per year. As a result, this estimated amount is not considered as a major stationary source of pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Energy and Biomass as a Clean Renewable Fuel)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide with Metal Oxides in Packed Bed Reactors—A Review from a Modeling Perspective with Practical Implications
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5316; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245316 - 05 Dec 2019
Abstract
Sulfur, and in particular, H2S removal is of significant importance in gas cleaning processes in different applications, including biogas production and biomass gasification. H2S removal with metal oxides is one of the most viable alternatives to achieve deep desulfurization. [...] Read more.
Sulfur, and in particular, H 2 S removal is of significant importance in gas cleaning processes in different applications, including biogas production and biomass gasification. H 2 S removal with metal oxides is one of the most viable alternatives to achieve deep desulfurization. This process is usually conducted in a packed bed configuration in order to provide a high solid surface area in contact with the gas stream per unit of volume. The operating temperature of the process could be as low as room temperature, which is the case in biogas production plants or as high as 900 C suitable for gasification processes. Depending on the operating temperature and the cleaning requirement, different metal oxides can be used including oxides of Ca, Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn. In this review, the criteria for the design and scale-up of a packed bed units are reviewed and simple relations allowing for quick assessment of process designs and experimental data are presented. Furthermore, modeling methods for the numerical simulation of a packed bed adsorber are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomass Energy and Biomass as a Clean Renewable Fuel)
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