Special Issue "Applied Single-Electron Transistors"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Greg Snider

University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanoelectronics; coulomb blockade; 1D poisson solver
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexei Orlov

275 Fitzpatrick, EE Dept, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA 46556
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Single-electron transistors (SETs) were developed in the 1980s, and, in recent years, have been used in a number of new and exciting applications. SET operation is based on the Coulomb blockade effect, under which the number of electrons on the nanoscale island is quantized, but can be changed by adjusting a potential on a capacitively coupled gate. In this way, the gate potential governs the transport from source to drain tunnel junctions. The Coulomb blockade oscillations in source-drain conductance give SETs unique capabilities for charge detection, making them the most sensitive electrometers to date capable of detecting a tiny fraction of elementary electron charge. SETs are, therefore, naturally suitable as sensors for various electrometric applications on nanoscale, ranging from ultimately scaled computer architectures, including quantum computing, to DNA and molecular sensing. SETs are intrinsically very fast devices, with an upper bandwidth boundary in the GHz range. High-speed applications of SETs became a hot research topic when developments in microwave measurements were combined with the unique capabilities of SETs.

This Special Issue will explore the current state of SET research, and highlight recent developments as well as emerging areas. Submissions are especially encouraged in areas that push the boundaries of SET applications.

Prof. Dr. Greg Snider
Prof. Dr. Alexei Orlov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Single electron transistor,
  • Coulomb blockade, Electrometer,Elemental charge sensors,
  • High-speed electrometers, charge,
  • Charge parity and spin-state readouts,
  • Radio-frequency charge sensing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Sharp Switching Characteristics of Single Electron Transistor with Discretized Charge Input
Appl. Sci. 2016, 6(8), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/app6080214
Received: 7 May 2016 / Revised: 20 July 2016 / Accepted: 22 July 2016 / Published: 29 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (896 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For the low-power consumption analog and digital circuit applications based on a single-electron transistor, enhancement of its switching performance is required. Our previous works analytically and numerically demonstrated that a discretized charge input device, which comprised a tunnel junction and two capacitors, improved [...] Read more.
For the low-power consumption analog and digital circuit applications based on a single-electron transistor, enhancement of its switching performance is required. Our previous works analytically and numerically demonstrated that a discretized charge input device, which comprised a tunnel junction and two capacitors, improved the gain characteristics of single-electron devices. We report the design and fabrication of an aluminum-based single-electron transistor having the discretized charge input function. Flat-plate and interdigital geometries were employed for adjusting capacitances of grounded and the coupling capacitors. The sample exhibited clear switching on input-output characteristics at the finite temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Single-Electron Transistors)
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Open AccessArticle
Detection of On-Chip Generated Weak Microwave Radiation Using Superconducting Normal-Metal SET
Appl. Sci. 2016, 6(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/app6020035
Received: 30 November 2015 / Revised: 13 January 2016 / Accepted: 19 January 2016 / Published: 27 January 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (9631 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present work addresses quantum interaction phenomena of microwave radiation with a single-electron tunneling system. For this study, an integrated circuit is implemented, combining on the same chip a Josephson junction (Al/AlO x /Al) oscillator and a single-electron transistor (SET) with the superconducting [...] Read more.
The present work addresses quantum interaction phenomena of microwave radiation with a single-electron tunneling system. For this study, an integrated circuit is implemented, combining on the same chip a Josephson junction (Al/AlO x /Al) oscillator and a single-electron transistor (SET) with the superconducting island (Al) and normal-conducting leads (AuPd). The transistor is demonstrated to operate as a very sensitive photon detector, sensing down to a few tens of photons per second in the microwave frequency range around f ∼ 100 GHz. On the other hand, the Josephson oscillator, realized as a two-junction SQUID and coupled to the detector via a coplanar transmission line (Al), is shown to provide a tunable source of microwave radiation: controllable variations in power or in frequency were accompanied by significant changes in the detector output, when applying magnetic flux or adjusting the voltage across the SQUID, respectively. It was also shown that the effect of substrate-mediated phonons, generated by our microwave source, on the detector output was negligibly small. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Single-Electron Transistors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Metal-Insulator-Metal Single Electron Transistors with Tunnel Barriers Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(3), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7030246
Received: 16 January 2017 / Accepted: 27 February 2017 / Published: 3 March 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (5024 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Single electron transistors are nanoscale electron devices that require thin, high-quality tunnel barriers to operate and have potential applications in sensing, metrology and beyond-CMOS computing schemes. Given that atomic layer deposition is used to form CMOS gate stacks with low trap densities and [...] Read more.
Single electron transistors are nanoscale electron devices that require thin, high-quality tunnel barriers to operate and have potential applications in sensing, metrology and beyond-CMOS computing schemes. Given that atomic layer deposition is used to form CMOS gate stacks with low trap densities and excellent thickness control, it is well-suited as a technique to form a variety of tunnel barriers. This work is a review of our recent research on atomic layer deposition and post-fabrication treatments to fabricate metallic single electron transistors with a variety of metals and dielectrics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Single-Electron Transistors)
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Open AccessReview
Stability of Single Electron Devices: Charge Offset Drift
Appl. Sci. 2016, 6(7), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/app6070187
Received: 14 April 2016 / Revised: 21 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 29 June 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (16376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Single electron devices (SEDs) afford the opportunity to isolate and manipulate individual electrons. This ability imbues SEDs with potential applications in a wide array of areas from metrology (current and capacitance) to quantum information. Success in each application ultimately requires exceptional performance, uniformity, [...] Read more.
Single electron devices (SEDs) afford the opportunity to isolate and manipulate individual electrons. This ability imbues SEDs with potential applications in a wide array of areas from metrology (current and capacitance) to quantum information. Success in each application ultimately requires exceptional performance, uniformity, and stability from SEDs which is currently unavailable. In this review, we discuss a time instability of SEDs that occurs at low frequency ( 1 Hz) called charge offset drift. We review experimental work which shows that charge offset drift is large in metal-based SEDs and absent in Si-SiO2-based devices. We discuss the experimental results in the context of glassy relaxation as well as prospects of SED device applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Single-Electron Transistors)
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Open AccessReview
Application of Single-Electron Transistor to Biomolecule and Ion Sensors
Appl. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/app6040094
Received: 30 December 2015 / Revised: 1 March 2016 / Accepted: 18 March 2016 / Published: 31 March 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The detection and quantification of chemical and biological species are the key technology in many areas of healthcare and life sciences. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are sophisticated devices used for the label-free and real-time detection of charged species. Nanowire channels were used for highly [...] Read more.
The detection and quantification of chemical and biological species are the key technology in many areas of healthcare and life sciences. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are sophisticated devices used for the label-free and real-time detection of charged species. Nanowire channels were used for highly sensitive detections of target ion or biomolecule in FET sensors, however, even significantly higher detection sensitivity is required in FET sensors, especially when the target species are dilute in concentration. Since the high detection sensitivity of nanowire FET sensors is due to the suppression of the carrier percolation effect through the channel, the channel width has to be decreased, leading to the decrease in the transconductance (gm). Therefore, gm should be increased while keeping channel width narrow to obtain higher sensitivity. Single-electron transistors (SETs) are a promising candidate for achieving higher detection sensitivity due to the Coulomb oscillations. However, no reports of an SET-based ion sensor or biosensor existed, probably because of the difficulty of the room-temperature operation of SETs. Recently, room-temperature SET operations were carried out using a Si multiple-island channel structure. This review introduces the mechanism of ultra-sensitive detection of ions and biomolecules based on an SET sensor and the experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Single-Electron Transistors)
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