Special Issue "Advanced Manufacturing of Metals"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Industrial Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Marco Sortino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Managerial and Mechanical Engineering, University of Udine, Italy
Interests: rapid prototyping; disassembly; micromachining and molding of micro-components; monitoring and optimization of machining processes; modeling and dynamics of machining processes; intelligent machining systems and adaptive control; machinability of metallic materials; statistical techniques for process control; manufacturing of parts for biomedical application; laser welding and cutting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced manufacturing of metals refers to the creation of metal structures by cutting, bending, and assembling processes. It is an additive manufacturing process involving the creation of machines, parts, and structures from various raw materials. Industrial production employs a multitude of value-added processes, including welding, cutting, forming, and machining. Welding is the main focus of steel fabrication, whereby formed and machined parts are assembled and tack-welded in place then rechecked for accuracy; cutting and burning are a variety of the tools used to cut raw material; forming converts flat sheet metal into 3D parts by applying force without adding or removing material; and machining is a specialized trade of removing material from a block of metal to make a desired shape. Fab shops generally have some machining capability and use metal lathes, mills, drills, and other portable machining tools. Most solid components are machined, for example, gears, bolts, screws, and nuts. Examples of standard metal fabrication materials are plate metal, formed and expanded metal, tube stock, welding wire/welding rod, and casting.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the state-of-the-art research on various domains of expertise related to the Special Issue theme.

The following are some examples of the topics proposed for this Special Issue:

  • Additive manufacturing, 3D printing
  • Advanced robotics and other intelligent production systems
  • Principal machining processes: turning, drilling, and milling
  • New industrial platform technologies

Dr. Marco Sortino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milling
  • metal cutting
  • laser melting
  • additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • mechanical processes
  • intelligent manufacturing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Tensile Shear Strength under Salt Spray Test on Dissimilar Metal Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy and Galvannealed Steel Sheet
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(22), 8116; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10228116 - 16 Nov 2020
Abstract
In order to reduce the weight of parts in the automobile and electronic industries, various research on dissimilar welding techniques of aluminum and steel is being carried out. Since dissimilar materials have different physical and electrochemical characteristics, joining through conventional fusion welding is [...] Read more.
In order to reduce the weight of parts in the automobile and electronic industries, various research on dissimilar welding techniques of aluminum and steel is being carried out. Since dissimilar materials have different physical and electrochemical characteristics, joining through conventional fusion welding is challenging, and there is a high probability of a decrease in strength of the welded joints. To solve this problem, a mechanical fastening method is mainly applied to join dissimilar parts with different material properties, but this process has disadvantages in terms of productivity improvement and cost reduction because additional consumables, such as rivets, are required. In this research, we investigated the optimization of the weld bonding conditions of joints using epoxy-based adhesive bonding and DeltaSpot welding for Al/Fe dissimilar materials. For each experimental condition, the corrosion resistance and tensile shear strength of the welded joints were evaluated according to salt spray test times of 0 h, 640 h, 1280 h, and 1920 h. As a whole, as the salt spray test time increased, the tensile shear strength of the welded joints decreased. It was confirmed that weld bonding, after manual polishing of the aluminum side, resulted in the highest average tensile shear strength of 5.88 kN at 1920 h, which was an increase compared with other conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Metals)
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