Plant Management and Soil Improvement in Specialty Crop Production

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 2147

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Biofuels Institute, School of Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
Interests: modern agriculture; phytoremediation; soil remediation; nanotechnology in environmental protection

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Guest Editor
School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: soil-plant system interactions; bioremediation; microbial ecology; soil environmental chemistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the importance of effective plant management and soil improvement practices in the production of specialty crops. Specialty crops are high-value crops that require optimal growing conditions to ensure healthy growth and high yields, such as fruits, vegetables, and herbs. The issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the latest research and best practices in plant management and soil improvement, including topics such as soil health, nutrient management, water management, pest and disease control, and sustainable production methods.

This Special Issue is intended for researchers, growers, and other stakeholders involved in the production of specialty crops, and aims to provide valuable insights into how to maximize yields and profits while minimizing environmental impact.

Topics for this call for papers include but are not restricted to:

  • Soil health
  • Nutrient management
  • Water management
  • Pest and disease control
  • Sustainable production methods
  • Plant growth
  • Soil remediation
  • Plant stress response and adaptation

Dr. Xunfeng Chen
Prof. Dr. Linchuan Fang
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant management
  • soil improvement
  • nutrient management
  • sustainable production
  • specialty crops

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2095 KiB  
Article
Optimum Transplanting Date for Rape Forage and Grain Yields in the Ridge Culture Place Planting System on the Yangtze River Delta
by Yueyue Tao, Dongmei Li, Yiwen Yu, Changying Lu, Meng Huang, Haihou Wang and Hua Sun
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3207; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083207 - 11 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The ridge culture place planting system (RCPPS) is a promising technique for planting rapeseed that can promote the growth of rapeseed by late rice stubble, which has been widely adopted in the Yangtze River delta. To determine the optimum planting date for rape [...] Read more.
The ridge culture place planting system (RCPPS) is a promising technique for planting rapeseed that can promote the growth of rapeseed by late rice stubble, which has been widely adopted in the Yangtze River delta. To determine the optimum planting date for rape (Brassica napus L.) forage and grain yield in an intensive rice–rape rotation system, a field experiment was conducted with five transplantation dates (from 20 October to 30 November at 10 day intervals) in RCPPS. The forage/grain yield, nutrition, and growth parameters were analyzed. At podding, rape biomass yield was highest, and no significant differences were found among treatments. It was around 12.0% crude protein, 11.4% ether extract, 38.8% neutral detergent fiber, and 34.9% acid detergent fiber. In the treatments of 20 and 30 November, crude protein content increased and acid detergent fiber content decreased significantly. Compared with 20 October, the grain yield of rape transplanted in November decreased significantly by 17.2% to 22.5%. The grain yield was significantly correlated with the number of secondary branches, pods, and seeds. At the final flowering stage, rape transplanted in November had noticeably reduced leaf growth, rhizome width, and yield than 20 and 30 October. Overall, for multiple uses of rapeseed in the Yangtze River delta belt with RCPPS, it is optimal to plant in mid to late November for forage use with higher nutritional value, being coordinated with the previous rice crop, whereas late October is the appropriate planting time to obtain a higher grain yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Management and Soil Improvement in Specialty Crop Production)
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14 pages, 5991 KiB  
Article
Correlation between Spring Wheat Physiological Indicators and UAV Digital Image Index in Hetao Irrigation Area
by Min Xie, Jun Luo, Lijun Li, Peng Zhang, Qiang Wu, Mengyuan Li, Haixia Wang and Yongping Zhang
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2294; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062294 - 8 Mar 2024
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Abstract
To accurately and non-destructively monitor the growth of spring wheat in the Hetao irrigation area, UAV remote sensing was employed during various fertility stages. Digital image indices from diverse fertilization treatments were calculated and compared with physiological indices to identify the most sensitive [...] Read more.
To accurately and non-destructively monitor the growth of spring wheat in the Hetao irrigation area, UAV remote sensing was employed during various fertility stages. Digital image indices from diverse fertilization treatments were calculated and compared with physiological indices to identify the most sensitive digital image indices corresponding to these indices. The study underscored the critical importance of the flowering stage in the growth of spring wheat, thus highlighting the necessity of focusing on this stage. This finding reiterated that the flowering stage was pivotal for spring wheat development in the Hetao Irrigation Area. Several digital image indices, such as GLA, R, G, INT, g, GRVI, MGRVI, RGBVI, EXG, and GRRI, exhibited a high frequency of significant correlations with physiological indices during the four primary reproductive stages of wheat. Consequently, these sensitive digital image indices during the flowering stage can more effectively characterize the physiological indices of spring wheat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Management and Soil Improvement in Specialty Crop Production)
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14 pages, 2674 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Vermicompost and Steel Slag Amendments on the Physicochemical Properties and Bacterial Community Structure of Acidic Soil Containing Copper Sulfide Mines
by Xiaojuan Wang, Jinchun Xue, Min He, Hui Qi and Shuting Wang
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 1289; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14031289 - 4 Feb 2024
Viewed by 685
Abstract
Acidification and heavy metal stress pose challenging threats to the terrestrial environment. This investigation endeavors to scrutinize the combined effects of vermicompost and steel slag, either singularly or in concert with Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), on the remediation of acidic soil resulting [...] Read more.
Acidification and heavy metal stress pose challenging threats to the terrestrial environment. This investigation endeavors to scrutinize the combined effects of vermicompost and steel slag, either singularly or in concert with Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), on the remediation of acidic soil resulting from sulfide copper mining. The findings illuminate substantial ameliorations in soil attributes. The application of these amendments precipitates an elevation in soil pH of 1.39–3.08, an augmentation in organic matter of 4.05–8.65, a concomitant reduction in total Cu content of 43.2–44.7%, and a marked mitigation in Cu bioavailability of 64.2–80.3%. The pronounced reduction in soil Cu bioavailability within the steel slag treatment group (L2) is noteworthy. Characterization analyses of vermicompost and steel slag further elucidate their propensity for sequestering Cu2+ ions in the soil matrix. Concerning botanical analysis, the vermicompost treatment group (L1) significantly enhances soil fertility, culminating in the accumulation of 208.35 mg kg−1 of Cu in L. perenne stems and 1412.05 mg kg−1 in the roots. Additionally, the introduction of vermicompost and steel slag enriches soil OTU (Operational Taxonomic Units) quantity, thereby augmenting soil bacterial community diversity. Particularly noteworthy is the substantial augmentation observed in OTU quantities for the vermicompost treatment group (L1) and the combined vermicompost with steel slag treatment group (L3), exhibiting increments of 126.04% and 119.53% in comparison to the control (CK). In summation, the application of vermicompost and steel slag efficaciously diminishes the bioavailability of Cu in the soil, augments Cu accumulation in L. perenne, induces shifts in the soil microbial community structure, and amplifies soil bacterial diversity. Crucially, the concomitant application of vermicompost and steel slag emerges as a holistic and promising strategy for the remediation of sulfide copper mining acidic soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Management and Soil Improvement in Specialty Crop Production)
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