Advances in the Biomechanics of Sports

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 1289

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, 104 Albee, 800 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI 54904, USA
Interests: biomechanical risk factors and mechanisms of sports and exercise injury; kinetic quantification of plyometric and other resistance exercise; neuromuscular responses and adaptations to resistance training; biomechanics teaching pedagogy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to submit a paper to this Special Issue on advances in the biomechanics of sports.

Sports and performance coaches, athletes, and medical personnel, such as athletic trainers and sports medicine physicians, increasingly rely on evidence-based information to inform their practice. Biomechanics is at the forefront of sports science and sports medicine research. Biomechanical principles can inform about and lead to preferential sporting techniques, improved training methods, better rehabilitation programs, safer equipment, and advancements in medical procedures.

In this Special Issue, submissions of contemporary research related to all aspects of sports biomechanics are invited. Possible topic areas broadly include the biomechanics of sports performance, strength and conditioning, and sports injury. Both experimental studies and review papers, including critically appraised topics, are welcome. We look forward to receiving your submissions.

With best regards,

Dr. Brian Wallace
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • injury
  • rehabilitation
  • sports training
  • brain injury
  • strength and conditioning
  • performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1912 KiB  
Article
Validity and Reliability of a Smartphone App for Vertical Jump Height Assessment Using the Marker Displacement Time Method
by Michał Murawa, Waldemar Krakowiak and Jarosław Kabaciński
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(11), 4843; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14114843 - 3 Jun 2024
Viewed by 111
Abstract
The correct assessment of the vertical jump height depends on an accurate and reliable measurement tool. This study aimed to determine the concurrent validity and reliability of the My Jump 2 app used for estimating the maximum height (MH) of the counter-movement jump [...] Read more.
The correct assessment of the vertical jump height depends on an accurate and reliable measurement tool. This study aimed to determine the concurrent validity and reliability of the My Jump 2 app used for estimating the maximum height (MH) of the counter-movement jump (CMJ). Twenty-one male adults participated in this study. The MH of the CMJ was estimated based on the displacement of the jumper’s center of mass (force platform), the displacement time of the reflective marker placed on the jumper’s sacrum (smartphone, My Jump 2-DT) and the flight time of the jumper (smartphone, My Jump 2-FT). The assessment of the concurrent validity showed a poor agreement (ICC = 0.362; Bland–Altman bias = 12.4 cm) between the My Jump 2-FT and force platform (p < 0.001), and a good agreement (ICC = 0.858; Bland–Altman bias = −0.2 cm) between the My Jump 2-DT and force platform (p < 0.001). The ICC values for internal consistency (>0.9) indicated the excellent reliability of all measurement tools (p < 0.001). The findings revealed the high accuracy and good reliability of the My Jump 2 app for the new method of MH estimation for the CMJ, including the displacement time of the marker placed on the jumper’s sacrum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Biomechanics of Sports)
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12 pages, 2331 KiB  
Article
Evolution of Core Stability, Athletic Performance, and ACL Injury Risk across a Soccer Season
by Théo A. Weber, Youri Duchene, Frédéric R. Simon, Guillaume Mornieux and Gerôme C. Gauchard
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(10), 4116; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14104116 - 13 May 2024
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Abstract
Soccer athletic performance varies across a soccer season due to training and fatigue. In addition, it is known that core stability is linked with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk but their variations over a season are unknown. The aim of the study [...] Read more.
Soccer athletic performance varies across a soccer season due to training and fatigue. In addition, it is known that core stability is linked with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk but their variations over a season are unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the evolution of core stability, athletic performance, and ACL injury risk among young high-level soccer players at four key moments of a season: pre-season (PRE), start of season (START), mid-season (MID), and the end of the season (END). Core stability scores increased until mid-season, while ACL injury risk scores (measured during sidestep cuttings and single-leg landing) decreased thanks to an injury prevention program between START and MID. These results are in line with the literature, which demonstrates that a high level of core stability is linked to a low injury risk. Evolution of athletic performance was not consistent throughout the season, being dependent on the specific phases of training performed by the athletes. Therefore, assessing core stability, athletic performance, and ACL injury risk multiple times across a soccer season could help coaches to adapt their training programs properly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Biomechanics of Sports)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: EVOLUTION OF CORE STABILITY, ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE AND ACL INJURY RISK DURING A SOCCER SEASON
Author: Mornieux
Highlights: The aim of the study was to determine the evolution of Core Stability, athletic performance and ACL injury risk of young high-level soccer players at 4 key moments of the season: pre-season, start of the season, mid-season and end of the season. Core Stability score increased until mid-season, while ACL injury risk score (measured during a change of direction) decreased. These results are in line with the literature which demonstrated that high level of Core Stability is link to a low injury risk. Regarding performance, few significant differences were found. Surprisingly, athletic performance (i.e. jumping height and shooting speed) was probably not trained enough to be improved at any time of the season.

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