Advances in Plant Methods: Antioxidant Activity in Plant Extracts

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Extraction and Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3145

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology of Plants, Spanish National Research Council, CSIC, Granada, Spain
Interests: fruit and vegetable antioxidants; proteomics; fruit ripening; reactive oxygen; and nitrogen species metabolism; signaling processes; abiotic stress; nitric oxide extract
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology of Plants, Spanish National Research Council, CSIC, Granada, Spain
Interests: plant antioxidants; nitric oxide; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; fruit ripening; abiotic/biotic stress; omics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants and fruits are a source of food and play an essential role in maintaining a balance against environmental factors including human-induced stressors, which are becoming a crucial problem nowadays. These stressors and changes affect all stages of the plant’s lifecycle, from development to fruit ripening. A growing number of investigations have shown the significance of good extraction and analysis methods, based on innovation and type of plant, to evaluate several issues.

It is a conditional of quality research that it possesses excellent tools of work such as extraction methods appropriate for analysis of factors such as the following:

  • Abiotic/biotic stress;
  • Antioxidant metabolism;
  • Nitro-oxidative stress;

The present Special Issue of Antioxidants aims to provide the most current extraction and analysis methods in plants and fruits, as well as to improve and extend the knowledge of higher plants related to mechanism of action, antioxidant metabolism, and abiotic/biotic stress. This Special Issue is open to different types of manuscripts, including reviews, original research papers, or new methods.

Dr. Marta Rodríguez-Ruiz
Dr. Salvador González Gordo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extraction methods
  • antioxidants
  • ripening
  • post-translational modification (PTMs)
  • redox signaling
  • nitro-oxidative stress
  • plant development
  • reactive oxygen species (ROS)
  • nitrogen oxygen species (RNS)
  • abiotic stress
  • biotic stress
  • nitric oxide
  • signaling processes
  • proteomics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 1036 KiB  
Article
Optimization and Validation of Procyanidins Extraction and Phytochemical Profiling of Seven Herbal Matrices of Nutraceutical Interest
by Niloufar Keivani, Vincenzo Piccolo, Adua Marzocchi, Maria Maisto, Gian Carlo Tenore and Vincenzo Summa
Antioxidants 2024, 13(5), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13050586 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 462
Abstract
Several medicinal herbal plants are extensively used as sources of bioactive compounds with beneficial effects on human health. This study assessed the procyanidin and polyphenol profiles together with the antioxidant potential of seven herbal medical matrices. To achieve this aim, procyanidin extraction from [...] Read more.
Several medicinal herbal plants are extensively used as sources of bioactive compounds with beneficial effects on human health. This study assessed the procyanidin and polyphenol profiles together with the antioxidant potential of seven herbal medical matrices. To achieve this aim, procyanidin extraction from grape pomace was optimized and validated by monitoring monomeric-trimeric procyanidins. The proposed quantification method was applied to the seven medical herbs, and it proved to be a very efficient protocol for procyanidin-rich extracts analysis. In addition, the Paullinia cupana Kunth. seed was identified as a very rich source of procyanidins (about 5 mg/g dry matrix of each dimeric and about 3 mg/g dry matrix trimeric) with high antioxidant properties. The polyphenolic profile was assessed by HPLC-HESI-MS/MS analysis. The in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH assay to explore the antioxidant properties of the extracts, which were substantially higher in Peumus boldus Molina leaves extracts (935.23 ± 169 μmol of Trolox equivalent/g of dry weight) concerning the other matrices. Moreover, a high Pearson coefficient value was observed between the total flavonoid content (TFC) and DPPH in comparison with the total polyphenol content (TPC) and DPPH, indicating flavonoids as the principal bioactive with antioxidant activity in the extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Methods: Antioxidant Activity in Plant Extracts)
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17 pages, 1789 KiB  
Article
The Health-Promoting Quality Attributes, Polyphenols, Iridoids and Antioxidant Activity during the Development and Ripening of Cornelian Cherry (Cornus mas L.)
by Dominika Przybylska, Alicja Z. Kucharska, Narcyz Piórecki and Tomasz Sozański
Antioxidants 2024, 13(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13020229 - 13 Feb 2024
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Abstract
This study defined the physicochemical attributes, composition, and antioxidant capacity of four Polish cultivars of cornelian cherry (CC) at six stages of development and ripening. A total of 52 metabolites were identified by UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS and quantified by HPLC-PDA. In general, phenolic acids, hydrolyzable [...] Read more.
This study defined the physicochemical attributes, composition, and antioxidant capacity of four Polish cultivars of cornelian cherry (CC) at six stages of development and ripening. A total of 52 metabolites were identified by UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS and quantified by HPLC-PDA. In general, phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, flavonols, iridoids, antioxidant activity, organic acids, and vitamin C decreased, while anthocyanins, malic acid, sugars, and titratable acidity increased. For the first time, we determined the evolution of the CC chemical properties and the metabolic behavior and quantified the individual compounds, and groups of compounds during ripening, in particular gallotannins, ellagitannins, iridoids, and organic acids. The main novelty of our study is that CC is a valuable resource for utilization at different degrees of maturity. We showed that unripe fruits in particular deserve valorization, as they contained the highest content of total bioactive phytocompounds (5589.1–6779.6 mg/100 g dw)—primarily phenolic acids > iridoids > tannins—and the highest antioxidant capacity. The intermediate stages were the most abundant in vitamin C (341.1–495.6 mg/100 g dw), ellagic acid (5.9–31.6 mg/100 g dw), gallotannins (47.8–331.1 mg/100 g dw), and loganic acid (1393.0–2839.4 mg/100 g dw). The ripe fruits contained less bioactive phytocompounds (1403.7–1974.6 mg/100 g dw)—primarily iridoids > phenolic acids > tannins > anthocyanins—and the lowest antioxidant capacity. On the other hand, ripe fruits showed the highest content of anthocyanins (30.8–143.2 mg/100 g dw), sugars (36.4–78.9 g/100 g dw), malic acid (5.5–12.2 g/100 g dw), and, favorably for the nutritional applications, the highest sugar-to-acids ratio (3.0–6.4). Our work illustrates in detail that quality attributes and the content of health-promoting phytocompounds in CC depend on the ripening stage and on the cultivar. These results advance the scientific knowledge about CC. Our findings can be helpful to select the optimal properties of CC for the development of diverse functional foods and phytopharmaceuticals applied in the prevention of civilization diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Methods: Antioxidant Activity in Plant Extracts)
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21 pages, 3459 KiB  
Article
Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Prestonia mollis Leaves and Their Impregnation into Polylactic Acid Using High-Pressure Technologies: Potential for Biomedical Application
by Gabriel Alfonso Burgos-Briones, Lidia Verano-Naranjo, Cristina Cejudo-Bastante, Alex Alberto Dueñas-Rivadeneira, Casimiro Mantell-Serrano and Lourdes Casas-Cardoso
Antioxidants 2023, 12(10), 1864; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12101864 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1288
Abstract
Enhanced solvent extraction (ESE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) have been used for the first time to obtain antioxidant compounds from Prestonia mollis leaves. The effects of pressure (100–250 bar), temperature (55–75 °C) and the composition of the extraction solvent (ethanol, water and [...] Read more.
Enhanced solvent extraction (ESE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) have been used for the first time to obtain antioxidant compounds from Prestonia mollis leaves. The effects of pressure (100–250 bar), temperature (55–75 °C) and the composition of the extraction solvent (ethanol, water and hydroalcoholic mixtures) were evaluated according to multilevel factorial designs. PLE provided the largest extraction yields compared to ESE, as well as a greater impact of the operating conditions studied. The highest total phenolic content was obtained when using a hydroalcoholic mixture (CO2/ethanol/water 50/25/25) through ESE at 100 bar and 75 °C. The antioxidant capacity of this extract is related to higher concentration levels of the identified flavonoids: Quercetin 3-O-xylosyl-rutinoside, Kaempferol 3-(2G-apiosylrobinobioside) and Kaempferol 4′-glucoside 7-rhamnoside. This extract was tested for the supercritical impregnation of polylactic acid (PLA), which is a polymer widely used in the biomedical industry. The influence of pressure (100–400 bar), temperature (35–55 °C), amount of extract (3–6 mL) and impregnation time (1–2 h) have been evaluated. The best results were obtained by impregnating 3 mL of extract at 100 bar and 55 °C for 2 h, achieving 10% inhibition with DPPH methods. The extract presented a potentially suitable impregnation of PLA for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Methods: Antioxidant Activity in Plant Extracts)
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