Special Issue "Dietary Antioxidants: Their Complex Interplay with Nutrients and Pharmaceuticals"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022 | Viewed by 2635

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Wallert
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Guest Editor
Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, Jena, Germany
Interests: vitamins; inflammation; metabolites; immune cells; macrophages; molecular biology; nutrition; atherosclerosis; fatty liver
Prof. Dr. Marc Birringer
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional, Food and Consumer Sciences, Fulda University of Applied Sciences, 36037 Fulda, Germany
Interests: oxidative stress; adaptive stress response; vitamins; nutrition; inflammation; natural products; antioxidants
Prof. Dr. Stefan Lorkowski
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, Jena, Germany
Interests: atherosclerosis; dyslipidemia; inflammation; nutrition; macrophages; adaptive stress response; fat-soluble vitamins and their metabolites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antioxidants are ubiquitous in human nutrition and have the potential to act as nutraceuticals in the prevention or therapy of many chronic diseases driven by oxidative stress. Several micronutrients, namely vitamins and phytochemicals, express antioxidative capacities by regulating redox homeostasis and redox signalling. It is known that for specific populations the dietary intake of antioxidative vitamins, such as vitamins E, D and C, is insufficient. To compensate the dietary deficiencies supplementation with multivitamin complexes or phytochemicals is widely used, regardless of the lack of knowledge on the potential synergistic or antagonistic effects of dietary antioxidants with nutrients and pharmaceuticals. There are central questions of interest which have not been answered so far: In which cell compartment do the dietary antioxidants actually release their potential and affect oxidative processes? How are exogenous antioxidants transported to their place of action? Do they interfere with endogenous antioxidative systems? Which factors, i.e., nutrients and drugs, do interfere with the uptake, bioavailability, accumulation, circulation and excretion of dietary antioxidants in the human body?

To address these questions, the Special Issue "Dietary Antioxidants: their complex interplay with nutrients and pharmaceuticals" aims to collect reports and reviews investigating the underlying molecular mechanisms of the bioavailability of dietary antioxidants, as well as antioxidant-nutrient interactions, antioxidant-drug interactions, and interferences of antioxidants with human metabolism. Furthermore, studies focusing on the development of new experimental approaches, analytical methods and targeted delivery systems of dietary antioxidants will be welcome.

Dr. Maria Wallert
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Marc Birringer 
Prof. Dr. Stefan Lorkowski
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioavailability
  • antioxidant-nutrient interactions
  • antioxidant-drug interactions
  • interferences of antioxidants with metabolism

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Interplay of Ascorbic Acid with Quinones-Chelators—Influence on Lipid Peroxidation: Insight into Anticancer Activity
Antioxidants 2022, 11(2), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11020376 - 13 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 552
Abstract
Ascorbic acid is a multifaceted compound that can perform both antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities in the redox reactions induced by transition metal ions, so its role in nature and especially in the human body is still the subject of debate. In the present [...] Read more.
Ascorbic acid is a multifaceted compound that can perform both antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities in the redox reactions induced by transition metal ions, so its role in nature and especially in the human body is still the subject of debate. In the present study, we have examined the influence of ascorbic acid on lipid peroxidation in a model system that mimics the cell membrane, namely micelles of linoleic acid (LA), induced by chelate complexes of iron and copper ions with quinone-chelator 2-phenyl-4-(butylamino)-naphtholquinoline-7,12-dione (Q1). This quinone effectively generates reactive oxygen species and semiquinone radicals inside cancer cells via a cycling redox reaction. Here it was demonstrated that in the absence of quinone-chelator ascorbic acid significantly accelerates the lipid peroxidation induced by both Fe(II) and Cu(II) ions. It has been shown also that Q1 chelate complexes with Fe(II) and Cu(II) ions are redox active in the LA micelles oxidation. No effect of ascorbate was detected on the reactivity of chelate complex with Fe(II) ions. On the other hand, ascorbate performs pro-oxidant activity in Q1-Cu(II) complex induced reaction. We can conclude that ascorbate-driven redox cycling of Q1 may promote its anti-tumor activity. Full article
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Article
Anti-Allergic Effects of Myrciaria dubia (Camu-Camu) Fruit Extract by Inhibiting Histamine H1 and H4 Receptors and Histidine Decarboxylase in RBL-2H3 Cells
Antioxidants 2022, 11(1), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11010104 - 31 Dec 2021
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Although Myrciaria dubia (camu-camu) has been shown to exert anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in both in vitro and in vivo studies, its use in allergic responses has not been elucidated. In the present study, the anti-allergic effect of 70% ethanol camu-camu fruit extract [...] Read more.
Although Myrciaria dubia (camu-camu) has been shown to exert anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in both in vitro and in vivo studies, its use in allergic responses has not been elucidated. In the present study, the anti-allergic effect of 70% ethanol camu-camu fruit extract was tested on calcium ionophore (A23187)-induced allergies in RBL-2H3 cells. The RBL-2H3 cells were induced with 100 nM A23187 for 6 h, followed by a 1 h camu-camu fruit extract treatment. A23187 sanitization exacerbated mast cell degranulation; however, camu-camu fruit extract decreased the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase, which are considered as key biomarkers in cell degranulation. Camu-camu fruit extract inhibited cell exocytosis by regulating the calcium/nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) signaling. By downregulating the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, camu-camu fruit extract hindered the activation of both histamine H1 and H4 receptors and inhibited histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression by mediating its transcription factors KLF4/SP1 and GATA2/MITF. In A23187-induced ROS overproduction, camu-camu fruit extract activated nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to protect mast cells against A23187-induced oxidative stress. These findings indicate that camu-camu fruit extract can be developed to act as a mast cell stabilizer and an anti-histamine. This work also “opens the door” to new investigations using natural products to achieve breakthroughs in allergic disorder treatment. Full article
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Article
The Inhibitory Activity of Curcumin on P-Glycoprotein and Its Uptake by and Efflux from LS180 Cells Is Not Affected by Its Galenic Formulation
Antioxidants 2021, 10(11), 1826; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10111826 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 660
Abstract
The biological activities of curcumin in humans, including its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory functions, are limited by its naturally low bioavailability. Different formulation strategies have been developed, but the uptake of curcumin from these galenic formulations into and efflux from intestinal cells, which may [...] Read more.
The biological activities of curcumin in humans, including its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory functions, are limited by its naturally low bioavailability. Different formulation strategies have been developed, but the uptake of curcumin from these galenic formulations into and efflux from intestinal cells, which may be critical processes limiting bioavailability, have not been directly compared. Furthermore, little is known about their effect on P-glycoprotein activity, an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics of potentially co-administered drugs. P-glycoprotein activity was determined in LS180 cells, incubated with 30 or 60 µmol/L of curcumin in the form of seven different formulations or native curcuma extract for 1 h. All formulations inhibited P-glycoprotein activity at both concentrations. Curcumin uptake, after 1 h incubation of LS180 cells with the formulations (60 µmol/L), showed significant variability but no consistent effects. After 1 h pre-treatment with the formulations and further 8 h with curcumin-free medium, curcumin in cell culture supernatants, reflecting the efflux, differed between individual formulations, again without a clear effect. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits P-glycoprotein activity independently of its formulation. Its uptake by and efflux from intestinal cells was not significantly different between formulations, indicating that these processes are not important regulatory points for its bioavailability. Full article
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