Special Issue "Optimization and Improvement of Veterinary Antimicrobial Treatment to Reduce Antimicrobial Resistance"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Petra Cagnardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: veterinary pharmacology; pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics; PK/PD correlation; treatments optimization
Dr. Aneliya Milanova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology, Animal Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria
Interests: veterinary pharmacology; pharmacokinetics; PK/PD modelling, ABC transporter proteins; antimicrobial peptides

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optimization of antimicrobial treatment in veterinary medicine is crucial for successful therapy while minimizing the risk of resistance selection. Antimicrobial resistance is mirroring the changing world, and the veterinary profession is being asked to properly address this challenge and promote the prudent use of antimicrobials. A multidisciplinary approach and broad multi-sectoral work by microbiologists, pharmacologists, immunologists, clinicians, animal nutritionists and specialists from closely related fields of animal science will contribute to finding proper solutions to this problem. The evaluation of messages from the consolidated surveillance of antimicrobial consumption and the emergency of resistance to antibacterial drugs could have additional value for the optimization of therapy.

Therefore, the main subject of this Special Issue includes any approach to optimize antimicrobial treatment in farm and companion animals. Manuscripts concerning multidisciplinary studies focused on animal-based indicators for the evaluation of the efficacy of antimicrobial treatments and the application of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration for the optimization of antimicrobial treatment are welcome. Manuscripts providing evidence and clear criteria for the improvement of veterinary antimicrobial treatment are also accepted.

This Special Issue is supported by COST Action CA18217—European Network for Optimization of Veterinary Antimicrobial Treatment.

Dr. Cagnardi Petra
Dr. Aneliya Milanova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobials
  • treatment optimization
  • PK/PD integration
  • companion animals
  • farm animals
  • antimicrobial therapy
  • antimicrobial resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling of Orally Administered Doxycycline to Rabbits at Different Ages
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10030310 - 17 Mar 2021
Viewed by 375
Abstract
Doxycycline is a well-tolerated tetracycline antibiotic, registered for use in rabbits and administered for treatment of bacterial infections in this animal species. Nevertheless, the available pharmacokinetic data are limited and this study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of orally administered doxycycline in mature [...] Read more.
Doxycycline is a well-tolerated tetracycline antibiotic, registered for use in rabbits and administered for treatment of bacterial infections in this animal species. Nevertheless, the available pharmacokinetic data are limited and this study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of orally administered doxycycline in mature and immature rabbits by application of the population approach. The rabbits were treated orally with doxycycline hyclate (5 mg/kg bw) in the form of a solid gelatin capsules. Free plasma concentrations were determined with HPLC analysis with Photodiode array detection. The estimated typical value of volume of distribution (tvV), total body clearance, and absorption rate constant were 4.429 L/kg, 1.473 L/kg/h, and 0.257 h−1, respectively. The highest between-subject variability (BSV) of 69.30% was observed for tvV. Co-variates such as body weight, age, and biochemical parameters did not improve the tested model and did not contribute to explanation of the BSV. The population pharmacokinetic model of the orally administered doxycycline in rabbits should be further developed by addition of data from more animals treated with higher doses. An oral dose of 5 mg/kg could ensure percentage of the time from the dosing interval during which the concentration is above minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) %fT > MIC of 35% if MIC of 0.18 μg·mL−1 and a dosing interval of 12 h is assumed which does not cover criteria for rational use of antibiotics. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Use of Local Antibiogram Data and Antimicrobial Importance Ratings to Select Optimal Empirical Therapies for Urinary Tract Infections in Dogs and Cats
Antibiotics 2020, 9(12), 924; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9120924 - 18 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
International and Australian veterinary antimicrobial use guidelines recommend amoxicillin or trimethoprim-sulfonamide (TMS) for the empirical treatment of sporadic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in dogs and cats. However, in practice, these antibiotics are rarely used, and no large-scale analyses have examined the antibiograms of [...] Read more.
International and Australian veterinary antimicrobial use guidelines recommend amoxicillin or trimethoprim-sulfonamide (TMS) for the empirical treatment of sporadic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in dogs and cats. However, in practice, these antibiotics are rarely used, and no large-scale analyses have examined the antibiograms of bacteria isolated from UTIs to validate these recommendations in Australia. We analyzed five years of urine culture and antimicrobial susceptibility data from an Australian veterinary laboratory. The analysis included 6196 urinary isolates from dogs and cats, 78% of which were from samples submitted by first-opinion veterinary clinics. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Proteus spp. were the most prevalent organisms. More than 80% of all isolated cocci were susceptible to amoxicillin, and more than 80% of bacilli were susceptible to TMS. A total of 94% of isolates were susceptible to at least one antimicrobial drug categorized as low-importance in Australia. The prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) was highest in E. coli, at 9.7%; 84% of these MDR isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate. We performed population-level antimicrobial treatment simulations and proposed a novel method for integrating antimicrobial importance ratings with antibiogram data to optimize the selection of empirical therapy. Our findings support current guideline recommendations to use amoxicillin or TMS. We also found that bacterial morphology assisted with selection; amoxicillin was a better choice for cocci and TMS for bacilli. Full article
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