Special Issue "A Selection of Studies Presented at Biotech 2020 Symposium"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 5553

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Flavia Marinelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Scienze della Vita, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Via J.H. Dunant 3, 21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: actinomycetes; natural products; antibiotics; resistome; glycopeptides; lantibiotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Olga Matatkova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: microbial biofilms; quorum sensing; inhibitors - biologically active substances and nanoparticles
Dr. Francesca Berini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, via J.H. Dunant 3, 21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: actinomycetes; secondary metabolites; bioactive proteins; fermentation; isolation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite the attendees of the Biotech 2020 Symposium to submit a review or original research article to the Special IssueA Selection of Studies Presented at Biotech 2020 Symposium” of the journal Antibiotics (MDPI, ISSN 2079-6382, impact factor 4.639), with Prof. Dr. Flavia Marinelli from University of Insubria, Italy, serving as the Guest Editor. Antibiotics is an international, open access journal of scientific studies related to all aspects of antibiotics, including pharmacodynamics, uses of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, and antimicrobial stewardship. Antibiotics is rigorously peer reviewed and edited, producing high-quality and rapid publications. Papers accepted after peer review will be published immediately online after author proofreading and processing.

The symposium participants who are interested to publish papers to this Special Issue are requested to send a tentative title and a short abstract of the intended contribution to Ms. Monica He ([email protected]), the Editor of Antibiotics. Please refer to the instructions for authors when preparing your manuscript. Submission deadline: October 31, 2021.

Prof. Dr. Flavia Marinelli
Dr. Olga Matatkova
Dr. Francesca Berini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Strain Improvement and Strain Maintenance Revisited. The Use of Actinoplanes teichomyceticus ATCC 31121 Protoplasts in the Identification of Candidates for Enhanced Teicoplanin Production
Antibiotics 2022, 11(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11010024 - 27 Dec 2021
Viewed by 854
Abstract
Multicellular cooperation in actinomycetes is a division of labor-based beneficial trait where phenotypically specialized clonal subpopulations, or genetically distinct lineages, perform complementary tasks. The division of labor improves the access to nutrients and optimizes reproductive and vegetative tasks while reducing the costly production [...] Read more.
Multicellular cooperation in actinomycetes is a division of labor-based beneficial trait where phenotypically specialized clonal subpopulations, or genetically distinct lineages, perform complementary tasks. The division of labor improves the access to nutrients and optimizes reproductive and vegetative tasks while reducing the costly production of secondary metabolites and/or of secreted enzymes. In this study, we took advantage of the possibility to isolate genetically distinct lineages deriving from the division of labor, for the isolation of heterogeneous teicoplanin producer phenotypes from Actinoplanes teichomyceticus ATCC 31121. In order to efficiently separate phenotypes and associated genomes, we produced and regenerated protoplasts. This approach turned out to be a rapid and effective strain improvement method, as it allowed the identification of those phenotypes in the population that produced higher teicoplanin amounts. Interestingly, a heterogeneous teicoplanin complex productivity pattern was also identified among the clones. This study suggests that strain improvement and strain maintenance should be integrated with the use of protoplasts as a strategy to unravel the hidden industrial potential of vegetative mycelium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Selection of Studies Presented at Biotech 2020 Symposium)
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Article
Genomic Insights into the Distribution and Phylogeny of Glycopeptide Resistance Determinants within the Actinobacteria Phylum
Antibiotics 2021, 10(12), 1533; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10121533 - 14 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 983
Abstract
The spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates a challenge for global health security, rendering many previously successful classes of antibiotics useless. Unfortunately, this also includes glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs), such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are currently being considered last-resort drugs. Emerging resistance towards [...] Read more.
The spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) creates a challenge for global health security, rendering many previously successful classes of antibiotics useless. Unfortunately, this also includes glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs), such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are currently being considered last-resort drugs. Emerging resistance towards GPAs risks limiting the clinical use of this class of antibiotics—our ultimate line of defense against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive pathogens. But where does this resistance come from? It is widely recognized that the GPA resistance determinants—van genes—might have originated from GPA producers, such as soil-dwelling Gram-positive actinobacteria, that use them for self-protection. In the current work, we present a comprehensive bioinformatics study on the distribution and phylogeny of GPA resistance determinants within the Actinobacteria phylum. Interestingly, van-like genes (vlgs) were found distributed in different arrangements not only among GPA-producing actinobacteria but also in the non-producers: more than 10% of the screened actinobacterial genomes contained one or multiple vlgs, while less than 1% encoded for a biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC). By phylogenetic reconstructions, our results highlight the co-evolution of the different vlgs, indicating that the most diffused are the ones coding for putative VanY carboxypeptidases, which can be found alone in the genomes or associated with a vanS/R regulatory pair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Selection of Studies Presented at Biotech 2020 Symposium)
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Article
Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts of Two Native Fruits of Chile: Arrayan (Luma apiculata) and Peumo (Cryptocarya alba)
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080444 - 25 Jul 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2869
Abstract
Arrayan and peumo fruits are commonly used in the traditional medicine of Chile. In this study, the concentration of the extracts halving the bacterial viability and biofilms formation and disruption of the drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was [...] Read more.
Arrayan and peumo fruits are commonly used in the traditional medicine of Chile. In this study, the concentration of the extracts halving the bacterial viability and biofilms formation and disruption of the drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was determined. The chemical composition of extracts was analyzed by high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (U-HPLC/MS). The arrayan extract (Inhibitory concentration IC50 0.35 ± 0.01 mg/mL) was more effective than peumo extract (IC50 0.53 ± 0.02 mg/mL) in the inhibition of S. aureus planktonic cells. Similarly, the arrayan extract was more effective in inhibiting the adhesion (S. aureus IC50 0.23 ± 0.02 mg/mL, P. aeruginosa IC50 0.29 ± 0.02 mg/mL) than peumo extracts (S. aureus IC50 0.47 ± 0.03 mg/mL, P. aeruginosa IC50 0.35 ± 0.01 mg/mL). Both extracts inhibited quorum sensing in a concentration-dependent manner, and the most significant was the autoinducer-2 type communication inhibition by arrayan extract. Both extracts also disrupted preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa (arrayan IC50 0.56 ± 0.04 mg/mL, peumo IC50 0.59 ± 0.04 mg/mL). However, neither arrayan nor peumo extracts disrupted S. aureus mature biofilm. U-HPLC/MS showed that both fruit extracts mainly possessed quercetin compounds; the peumo fruit extract also contained phenolic acids and phenylpropanoids. Our results suggested that both extracts could be used as natural antimicrobials for some skin and nosocomial infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Selection of Studies Presented at Biotech 2020 Symposium)
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