Epidemiology of Zoonotic Pathogens and Antimicrobial Resistance

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1049

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Immunology & Histocompatibility, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, 41500 Larissa, Greece
Interests: microbiology; antibiotic resistance; laboratory medicine; one health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public and One Health, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece
Interests: zoonoses; antimicrobial resistance; molecular epidemiology; biofilm production; emerging pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term zoonotic pathogens includes bacterial, viral and parasitic infectious agents that can spread to humans through any contact point with companion, livestock, domestic or wild animals. All of the above pathogens carry genes that affect their toxicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents; the transfer of genetic information between different species of pathogens leads to the emergence of the antimicrobial resistance.

Antimicrobial resistance in the last two decades has become a global threat to public health systems that does not recognize barriers and can spread from animals to people and the environment and vice versa.

This Special Issue aims to provide you with an overview of the latest epidemiological data on zoonoses. It is addressed to scientists, researchers and professionals working in fields related to these diseases.

Dr. Styliani Sarrou
Dr. Dimitris C. Chatzopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zoonoses
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • epidemiology
  • one health

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 928 KiB  
Article
Recovery of Staphylococci from Teatcups in Milking Parlours in Goat Herds in Greece: Prevalence, Identification, Biofilm Formation, Patterns of Antibiotic Susceptibility, Predictors for Isolation
by Charalambia K. Michael, Daphne T. Lianou, Katerina Tsilipounidaki, Dimitris A. Gougoulis, Themistoklis Giannoulis, Natalia G. C. Vasileiou, Vasia S. Mavrogianni, Efthymia Petinaki and George C. Fthenakis
Antibiotics 2023, 12(9), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12091428 - 10 Sep 2023
Viewed by 871
Abstract
The objectives of this work are (a) to describe staphylococci on the teatcups of milking parlours in goat farms and identify predictors for the presence of staphylococcal isolates on the teatcups, (b) to evaluate relationships with total bacterial counts and somatic cell counts [...] Read more.
The objectives of this work are (a) to describe staphylococci on the teatcups of milking parlours in goat farms and identify predictors for the presence of staphylococcal isolates on the teatcups, (b) to evaluate relationships with total bacterial counts and somatic cell counts in bulk-tank milk, and (c) to establish patterns of susceptibility to antibiotics for the staphylococcal isolates and identify predictors for the recovery of resistant isolates. In a cross-sectional study of 66 goat farms across Greece, swab samples were collected from 303 teatcups (upper and lower part) for staphylococcal recovery, identification, and assessment of biofilm formation. Details regarding health management on the farms (including conditions in the milking parlour) and the socio-demographic characteristics of farmers were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. A total of 87 contaminated teatcups (28.7%) were found on 35 goat farms (53.0%). Staphylococci were more frequently recovered from the upper than the lower part of teatcups: 73 versus 43 teatcups, respectively. After identification, 67 staphylococcal isolates (i.e., excluding similar isolates) were recovered from the teatcups; Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus capitis, and Staphylococcus equorum predominated. Of these isolates, 82.1% were biofilm-forming. In multivariable analysis, the annual incidence of clinical mastitis in the herd emerged as the only significant factor associated with the isolation of staphylococci from the teatcups. Of the 67 isolates, 23 (34.3%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 14 (22.4%) were multi-resistant. Resistance was found most commonly against penicillin and ampicillin (22.4% of isolates), fosfomycin (17.9%), clindamycin (14.9%), erythromycin, and tetracycline (13.4%). In multivariable analysis, the annual incidence of clinical mastitis in the herd and the use of detergent for parlour cleaning emerged as significant factors associated with the isolation of staphylococci resistant to antibiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology of Zoonotic Pathogens and Antimicrobial Resistance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop