Special Issue "Wildlife Conservation and Ethics"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Ethics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Barbara de Mori
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, Università degli Studi di Padova, Viale dell’Università 16, Agripolis, 35020 Legnaro, Italy
Interests: conservation ethics; animal welfare ethics; animal welfare and conservation; veterinary ethics; ethical reasoning; ethical review process; ethics and darwinism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Simona Normando
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, Università degli Studi di Padova, Viale dell’Università 16, Agripolis, 35020 Legnaro, Italy
Interests: applied ethology; veterinary behavioural medicine; human–animal relationship; environmental enrichment; animal quality of life; behavioural observations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Pierfrancesco Biasetti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Reproduction Management, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife, Berlin, Germany
Interests: conservation ethics; conflict analysis; values clarification; ethical review processes of conservation projects; ethical and theoretical aspects in biodiversity conservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the era of the sixth mass extinction, wildlife conservation is an increasingly urgent topic. As a value-laden enterprise, it is generally guided by confidence in the worth of biodiversity and the natural environment. However, decision-making processes in wildlife conservation do not involve only environmental values but intersect with several other ethical issues, such as demands of social justice or respect for animal welfare. These kinds of ethical conflicts may severely compromise the success of conservation efforts. This Special Issue aims to focus on the ethical dimension of wildlife conservation in all its different meanings and levels and welcomes contributions from all fields of expertise in conservation. Special attention will be devoted to recent developments and to possible challenges raised by crucial events on a worldwide scale, such as the massive fires in Australia and other countries, or the recent COVID-19 pandemic.

We welcome submissions addressing any relevant topic regarding the relationship between ethics and wildlife conservation. Contributions include but are not limited to the following categories: theoretical contributions that expound, analyze, compare, and question the different ethical perspectives that may guide conservation efforts; research papers and case reports; papers highlighting usually marginalized or utterly unexplored ethical issues and conflicts in wildlife conservation, or that show unexpected and non-environmentally related ethical relevance of conservation efforts.

Dr. Barbara de Mori
Dr. Simona Normando
Dr. Pierfrancesco Biasetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wildlife conservation
  • conservation ethics
  • animal welfare and conservation
  • tools for ethical analysis in conservation
  • value conflicts in conservation
  • social justice and conservation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Wildlife Farms, Stigma and Harm
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101783 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1079
Abstract
Wildlife farming, the commercial breeding and legal sale of non-domesticated species, is an increasingly prevalent, persistently controversial, and understudied conservation practice. The adoption or rejection of wildlife farms is a complex process that incorporates numerous ethical considerations: conservation, livelihoods, animal welfare, and cultural [...] Read more.
Wildlife farming, the commercial breeding and legal sale of non-domesticated species, is an increasingly prevalent, persistently controversial, and understudied conservation practice. The adoption or rejection of wildlife farms is a complex process that incorporates numerous ethical considerations: conservation, livelihoods, animal welfare, and cultural practices. This paper uses qualitative interview data with key informants (academics) to analyze (a) the harms and benefits of wildlife farms and (b) the factors that influence whether wildlife farms are stigmatized or accepted. In evaluations of wildlife farming’s harms and benefits, respondents incorporated multiple considerations: animal welfare, environmental impacts, scale disparities between sustenance and commercial farms, consumer preferences, species differences, the substitutability and accessibility of wildlife products, and governance. The results further indicated that the stigmatization or acceptance of wildlife farms is affected by the “wildlife farm” label, if there is a stigma around use of a species, a form of production, or the perceived quality of a wildlife product, cultural differences in wildlife use, wildlife consumer typology, geopolitical factors, and demand reduction efforts. This paper analyzes the complexities of wildlife farming such that stakeholders can understand the impacts of this practice on species, human communities, individual animals, and the legal and illegal wildlife trades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation and Ethics)

Other

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Commentary
Finding Purpose in the Conservation of Biodiversity by the Commingling of Science and Ethics
Animals 2021, 11(3), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030837 - 16 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1046
Abstract
Averting the biodiversity crisis requires closing a gap between how humans tend to behave, individually and collectively, and how we ought to behave—“ought to” in the sense of behaviors required to avert the biodiversity crisis. Closing that gap requires synthesizing insight from ethics [...] Read more.
Averting the biodiversity crisis requires closing a gap between how humans tend to behave, individually and collectively, and how we ought to behave—“ought to” in the sense of behaviors required to avert the biodiversity crisis. Closing that gap requires synthesizing insight from ethics with insights from social and behavioral sciences. This article contributes to that synthesis, which presents in several provocative hypotheses: (i) Lessening the biodiversity crisis requires promoting pro-conservation behavior among humans. Doing so requires better scientific understanding of how one’s sense of purpose in life affects conservation-relevant behaviors. Psychology and virtue-focused ethics indicate that behavior is importantly influenced by one’s purpose. However, conservation psychology has neglected inquiries on (a) the influence of one’s purpose (both the content and strength of one’s purpose) on conservation-related behaviors and (b) how to foster pro-conservation purposes; (ii) lessening the biodiversity crisis requires governance—the regulation of behavior by governments, markets or other organization through various means, including laws, norms, and power—to explicitly take conservation as one of its fundamental purposes and to do so across scales of human behaviors, from local communities to nations and corporations; (iii) lessening the biodiversity crisis requires intervention via governance to nudge human behavior in line with the purpose of conservation without undue infringement on other basic values. Aligning human behavior with conservation is inhibited by the underlying purpose of conservation being underspecified. Adequate specification of conservation’s purpose will require additional interdisciplinary research involving insights from ethics, social and behavioral sciences, and conservation biology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation and Ethics)
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