Special Issue "Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Animals: Advances in Their Measurement and Practical Applications"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Camila Peres Rubio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: analytical and clinical validation; biomarkers of health and welfare; non-invasive techniques; oxidative stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Breno Fernando Martins de Almeida
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Centro Universitário das Faculdades Integradas de Ourinhos (Unifio), 19909-100, Ourinhos - São Paulo State, Brazil
Interests: veterinary clinical pathology and immunology, oxidative stress, chronic kidney disease, postprandial lipemia and canine visceral leishmaniosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The research on oxidative stress in companion, production, and exotic animals has been growing rapidly in recent years. These studies have led to the knowledge that oxidant production and the antioxidant compensatory response occur differently according to animals’ physiological or pathological situation. In addition, biomarkers of oxidative stress have been used to monitor the disease progression or treatment of various diseases in different species, such as leishmaniosis or parvoviral enteritis in dogs and pneumonia or sepsis in pigs.

There are numerous assays that can be used to evaluate oxidative status. These assays can assess the antioxidant response by quantification of selected molecules (e.g., α-tocopherol, β-carotene, or glutathione) but also by the overall antioxidant status determination of a sample through the use of different assays such as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), or cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). In addition, the oxidants produced can be estimated individually (e.g., superoxide radical, carbonyls, F2-isoprostanes, and 8-hydroxyguanine) or through the overall oxidant status by using assays such as total oxidant status (TOS), ferric-xylenol orange (FOX), and reactive oxygen metabolite-derived compounds (d-ROMs).

With the increased research in this field, it has been shown that in addition to blood, these markers can also be measured in other sample types such as urine, milk, or saliva, opening new possibilities for use and application.

This Special Issue has the aim of advancing the research of biomarkers of oxidative stress in animals. Studies dealing with physiological or clinical applications of these biomarkers in different species and types of samples will be welcome as well as investigations about the analytical validation or development of new assays. They will undoubtedly contribute to a better knowledge of the possible use and applications of the assays for the evaluation of oxidative status in veterinary science.

Dr. Camila P Rubio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • analytical methods
  • antioxidants
  • clinical application
  • comparative studies
  • global assays
  • reactive oxygen species

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Changes in Serum Thiol-Disulphide Homeostasis in Sheep with Gastrointestinal Nematodes
Animals 2021, 11(10), 2856; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11102856 - 30 Sep 2021
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Abstract
This work aimed to evaluate the thiol-disulphide homeostasis in serum of lambs naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes presenting different levels of parasite load indirectly indicated by faecal worm egg counts (EPG). Furthermore, the possible changes in the thiol-disulphide dynamic after different procedures to [...] Read more.
This work aimed to evaluate the thiol-disulphide homeostasis in serum of lambs naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes presenting different levels of parasite load indirectly indicated by faecal worm egg counts (EPG). Furthermore, the possible changes in the thiol-disulphide dynamic after different procedures to reduce the parasitic charge, such as the integrated crop-livestock system or anthelmintic treatment, were assessed. The results were compared with a panel of various oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. The lambs were divided into three groups: animals highly infected (EPG higher than 5000) and packed cell volume (PCV) lower than 24% (G1); animals highly infected (EPG higher than 5000) and normal PCV (>24%) (G2); and animals presenting EPG lower than 5000 and normal PCV (>24%) (G3). The highly infected lambs (G1 and G2) showed lower total thiol (TT) and native thiol (SH) (p ≤ 0.01) than those from G3. After treatment, TT and SH increased significantly in all groups (p ≤ 0.01), and the disulphide (SS)/TT and SS/SH ratios decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in G1 and G2. These results show that the thiol-disulphide balance was impaired in lambs infected by gastrointestinal nematodes and that it could be potentially used as a biomarker to monitor this disease. Full article
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Article
Effects of High-Frequency Electrical Stunning Current Intensities on Pre-Slaughter Stunning Stress and Meat Lipid Oxidation in Geese
Animals 2021, 11(8), 2376; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082376 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 857
Abstract
Intensive slaughtering with electrical stunning (ES) is replacing traditional manual slaughtering of geese in China. This study aimed to assess stunning stress and meat lipid oxidation in geese stunned by high-frequency current intensities. Forty male Yangzhou geese, 92 days old, were randomly allocated [...] Read more.
Intensive slaughtering with electrical stunning (ES) is replacing traditional manual slaughtering of geese in China. This study aimed to assess stunning stress and meat lipid oxidation in geese stunned by high-frequency current intensities. Forty male Yangzhou geese, 92 days old, were randomly allocated into five treatments with eight replicates per treatment. The geese in the control group were not stunned, while the other birds were stunned by alternating current (AC) in a water bath. Each bird received a current intensity of 20 mA (E20mA), 40 mA (E40mA), 70 mA (E70mA), or 100 mA (E100mA) for 10 s at 500 Hz. The gene expression of c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 tended to decrease in the E40mA birds (p = 0.08). Stunning with 40 mA resulted in the maximum serum uric acid and urea among the ES groups and decreased serum adrenocorticotropin and creatine kinase (p < 0.01) compared with 70 mA and 100 mA. Increasing the current intensity reduced the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl free radical elimination ability and total-superoxide dismutase linearly in goose breast meat at d 2 and in thigh meat at d 0 (all p < 0.01). Stunning geese with 40 mA at 500 Hz for 10 s could alleviate stunning stress and meat lipid oxidation. Full article
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Article
Application of Non-Destructive Methods: Biomarker Assays in Blood of White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) Nestlings
Animals 2021, 11(8), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11082341 - 08 Aug 2021
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Abstract
White stork (Ciconia ciconia) nestlings can provide quantitative information on the quality of the surrounding environment by indicating the presence of pollutants, as they depend on locally foraged food. This study represents the first comparison of biomarkers in two fractions of [...] Read more.
White stork (Ciconia ciconia) nestlings can provide quantitative information on the quality of the surrounding environment by indicating the presence of pollutants, as they depend on locally foraged food. This study represents the first comparison of biomarkers in two fractions of white stork nestling blood: plasma and S9 (the post-mitochondrial fraction). The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CES), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR), as well as to establish a novel fluorescence-based method for glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection in plasma and S9. Considering the enzymatic biomarkers, lower variability in plasma was detected only for AChE, as CES, GST, and GR had lower variability in S9. Enzyme activity was higher in plasma for AChE, CES, and GST, while GR had higher activity in S9. Regarding the fluorescence-based method, lower variability was detected in plasma for GSH and ROS, although higher GSH detection was reported in S9, and higher ROS was detected in plasma. The present study indicated valuable differences by successfully establishing protocols for biomarker measurement in plasma and S9 based on variability, enzyme activity, and fluorescence. For a better understanding of the environmental effects on nestlings’ physiological condition, biomarkers can be measured in plasma and S9. Full article
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