Special Issue "Reducing Enteric Methane Emissions from Ruminants"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal System and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ed Charmley
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation | CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Canberra, Australia
Interests: use of technology to record hard to measure animal and environmental variables in the field, understanding livestock methane emissions from extensive grazing systems and improving the feed efficiency of ruminants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Worldwide ruminants play a major role in the production of meat, milk, fibre, and draught power for a growing human population, but at the same time, their sheer numbers present a threat to the global climate. As a by-product of anaerobic microbial digestive processes, ruminants produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas having 25 times the global warming potential of CO2. It is estimated that domesticated ruminants produce about 7 gigatonnes (Gt) CO2 equivalent per year, which is equivalent to 14.5% of total global anthropogenic GHGs. With a growing human population, coupled with increasing affluence, especially in Asia, the demand for ruminant products continues to grow. Meanwhile, in developed nations, concern regarding the environmental footprint of ruminant products is leading to reduced consumption of ruminant products. Faced with these challenges, there is a clear imperative to lower the production and intensity of methane emissions (the methane emission per unit of useful product). Science-based solutions to improve the efficiency of ruminant systems and reducing the production of methane in the rumen are leading to real possibilities for substantial reductions of GHG emissions from ruminant livestock. In this Special Issue, we will highlight the latest research in ruminant methane mitigation from a wide range of contributors from across the globe.

We invite original research papers on methods to reduce methane emissions intensity through modification of the rumen environment or the ruminant production system. Suitable topics include: Rumen microbiology and biochemistry, nutritional manipulation of methane emissions, feed additives, genetic selection for low methane animals, vaccination, antimethanogenic plants, and agricultural systems or practices that reduce enteric methane intensity, including modelling.

Dr. Ed Charmley
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • methane mitigation
  • rumen microbiology
  • intensity
  • emissions
  • nutrition
  • genetics
  • cattle
  • sheep
  • goat

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nitroethanol in Comparison with Monensin Exhibits Greater Feed Efficiency Through Inhibiting Rumen Methanogenesis More Efficiently and Persistently in Feedlotting Lambs
Animals 2019, 9(10), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9100784 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study was conducted to determine the dietary supplemental effects of nitroethanol (NEOH) in comparison with monensin on growth performance and estimated methane (CH4) production in feedlotting lambs. Sixty male, small-tailed Chinese Han lambs were arranged at random into three dietary [...] Read more.
This study was conducted to determine the dietary supplemental effects of nitroethanol (NEOH) in comparison with monensin on growth performance and estimated methane (CH4) production in feedlotting lambs. Sixty male, small-tailed Chinese Han lambs were arranged at random into three dietary treatment groups: (1) a basal control diet (CTR), (2) the basal diet added with 40 mg/kg monensin (MON), (3) the basal diet added with 277 mg/kg nitroethanol (NEOH). During the 32-day lamb feeding, monensin and nitroethanol were added in period 1 (day 0–16) and then withdrawn in the subsequent period 2 (day 17–32) to determine their withdrawal effects. The average daily gain (ADG) and feed conversion rate in the whole period ranked: NEOH > MON > CTR (p < 0.01), suggesting that the dietary addition of NEOH in comparison with monensin presented a more lasting beneficial effect on feed efficiency. Methane emission was estimated with rumen VFA production and gross energy intake. Both monensin and NEOH addition in comparison with the control remarkably decreased CH4 emission estimate (24.0% vs. 26.4% decrease; p < 0.01) as well as CH4 emission per kg ADG (8.7% vs. 14.0% decrease; p < 0.01), but the NEOH group presented obvious lasting methanogenesis inhibition when they were withdrawn in period 2. Moreover, the in vitro methanogenic activity of rumen fluids was also decreased with monensin or NEOH addition (12.7% vs. 30.5% decrease; p < 0.01). In summary, the dietary addition of NEOH in comparison with monensin presented a greater promoting effect on growth performance in feedlotting lambs by inhibiting rumen methanogenesis more efficiently and persistently. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reducing Enteric Methane Emissions from Ruminants)
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Open AccessArticle
Rumen and Fecal Microbial Community Structure of Holstein and Jersey Dairy Cows as Affected by Breed, Diet, and Residual Feed Intake
Animals 2019, 9(8), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080498 - 29 Jul 2019
Abstract
Identifying factors that influence the composition of the microbial population in the digestive system of dairy cattle will be key in regulating these populations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this study, we analyzed rumen and fecal samples from five high residual feed [...] Read more.
Identifying factors that influence the composition of the microbial population in the digestive system of dairy cattle will be key in regulating these populations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this study, we analyzed rumen and fecal samples from five high residual feed intake (RFI) Holstein cows, five low RFI Holstein cows, five high RFI Jersey cows and five low RFI Jersey cows, fed either a high-concentrate diet (expected to reduce methane emission) or a high-forage diet. Bacterial communities from both the rumen and feces were profiled using Illumina sequencing on the 16S rRNA gene. Rumen archaeal communities were profiled using Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting the mcrA gene. The rumen methanogen community was influenced by breed but not by diet or RFI. The rumen bacterial community was influenced by breed and diet but not by RFI. The fecal bacterial community was influenced by individual animal variation and, to a lesser extent, by breed and diet but not by RFI. Only the bacterial community correlated with methane production. Community differences seen in the rumen were reduced or absent in feces, except in the case of animal-to-animal variation, where differences were more pronounced. The two cattle breeds had different levels of response to the dietary intervention; therefore, it may be appropriate to individually tailor methane reduction strategies to each cattle breed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reducing Enteric Methane Emissions from Ruminants)
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