Special Issue "New Frontiers in Parameterized Complexity and Algorithms"

A special issue of Algorithms (ISSN 1999-4893).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Frances Rosamond Website E-Mail
Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5020 Bergen, Norway
Interests: kernelization, parameterized algorithms, parameterized complexity
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Neeldhara Misra Website E-Mail
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Palaj, Gandhinagar-382355, India
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Meirav Zehavi Website E-Mail
Department of Computer Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contributions are invited to a Journal of Algorithms Special Issue on parameterized complexity and parameterized algorithms. Submissions are welcome encompassing the entire breadth of research in this area, both theoretical and experimental. This includes new developments in lower bounds and fine-grained parameterized complexity analysis. Particularly invited are articles on new research directions and new paradigms of problem parameterization that have been little explored.

Prof. Dr. Frances Rosamond
Guest Editor

Dr. Neeldhara Misra
Dr. Meirav Zehari
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Algorithms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • FPT
  • Parameterized complexity
  • Kernelization
  • Lower bounds
  • Fine-grained
  • Heuristics
  • Turbo-charged
  • ETH/SETH

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Parameterised Enumeration for Modification Problems
Algorithms 2019, 12(9), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/a12090189 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
Recently, Creignou et al. (Theory Comput. Syst. 2017), introduced the class Delay FPT into parameterised complexity theory in order to capture the notion of efficiently solvable parameterised enumeration problems. In this paper, we propose a framework for parameterised ordered enumeration and will show [...] Read more.
Recently, Creignou et al. (Theory Comput. Syst. 2017), introduced the class Delay FPT into parameterised complexity theory in order to capture the notion of efficiently solvable parameterised enumeration problems. In this paper, we propose a framework for parameterised ordered enumeration and will show how to obtain enumeration algorithms running with an FPT delay in the context of general modification problems. We study these problems considering two different orders of solutions, namely, lexicographic order and order by size. Furthermore, we present two generic algorithmic strategies. The first one is based on the well-known principle of self-reducibility and is used in the context of lexicographic order. The second one shows that the existence of a neighbourhood structure among the solutions implies the existence of an algorithm running with FPT delay which outputs all solutions ordered non-decreasingly by their size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Parameterized Complexity and Algorithms)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Compendium of Parameterized Problems at Higher Levels of the Polynomial Hierarchy
Algorithms 2019, 12(9), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/a12090188 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
We present a list of parameterized problems together with a complexity classification of whether they allow a fixed-parameter tractable reduction to SAT or not. These problems are parameterized versions of problems whose complexity lies at the second level of the Polynomial Hierarchy or [...] Read more.
We present a list of parameterized problems together with a complexity classification of whether they allow a fixed-parameter tractable reduction to SAT or not. These problems are parameterized versions of problems whose complexity lies at the second level of the Polynomial Hierarchy or higher. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Parameterized Complexity and Algorithms)
Open AccessArticle
Practical Access to Dynamic Programming on Tree Decompositions
Algorithms 2019, 12(8), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/a12080172 - 16 Aug 2019
Abstract
Parameterized complexity theory has led to a wide range of algorithmic breakthroughs within the last few decades, but the practicability of these methods for real-world problems is still not well understood. We investigate the practicability of one of the fundamental approaches of this [...] Read more.
Parameterized complexity theory has led to a wide range of algorithmic breakthroughs within the last few decades, but the practicability of these methods for real-world problems is still not well understood. We investigate the practicability of one of the fundamental approaches of this field: dynamic programming on tree decompositions. Indisputably, this is a key technique in parameterized algorithms and modern algorithm design. Despite the enormous impact of this approach in theory, it still has very little influence on practical implementations. The reasons for this phenomenon are manifold. One of them is the simple fact that such an implementation requires a long chain of non-trivial tasks (as computing the decomposition, preparing it, …). We provide an easy way to implement such dynamic programs that only requires the definition of the update rules. With this interface, dynamic programs for various problems, such as 3-coloring, can be implemented easily in about 100 lines of structured Java code. The theoretical foundation of the success of dynamic programming on tree decompositions is well understood due to Courcelle’s celebrated theorem, which states that every MSO-definable problem can be efficiently solved if a tree decomposition of small width is given. We seek to provide practical access to this theorem as well, by presenting a lightweight model checker for a small fragment of MSO 1 (that is, we do not consider “edge-set-based” problems). This fragment is powerful enough to describe many natural problems, and our model checker turns out to be very competitive against similar state-of-the-art tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Parameterized Complexity and Algorithms)
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Open AccessArticle
Randomized Parameterized Algorithms for the Kidney Exchange Problem
Algorithms 2019, 12(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/a12020050 - 25 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In order to increase the potential kidney transplants between patients and their incompatible donors, kidney exchange programs have been created in many countries. In the programs, designing algorithms for the kidney exchange problem plays a critical role. The graph theory model of the [...] Read more.
In order to increase the potential kidney transplants between patients and their incompatible donors, kidney exchange programs have been created in many countries. In the programs, designing algorithms for the kidney exchange problem plays a critical role. The graph theory model of the kidney exchange problem is to find a maximum weight packing of vertex-disjoint cycles and chains for a given weighted digraph. In general, the length of cycles is not more than a given constant L (typically 2 L 5), and the objective function corresponds to maximizing the number of possible kidney transplants. In this paper, we study the parameterized complexity and randomized algorithms for the kidney exchange problem without chains from theory. We construct two different parameterized models of the kidney exchange problem for two cases L = 3 and L 3, and propose two randomized parameterized algorithms based on the random partitioning technique and the randomized algebraic technique, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Parameterized Complexity and Algorithms)
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