Special Issue "Senescence of Crop Plants"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Karin Krupinska

Institute of Botany, University of Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, 24098, Kiel, Germany
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Phone: +49 431 880 4240
Fax: +49 431 880 4238

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Senescence, or the lifespan of plants, is a major determinant of crop plant productivity. Research in this area is highly important to secure world-wide supply of food and feed, as well as biomass for the production of energy. Despite its paramount importance for plant productivity and quality, knowledge about the factors determining the functional lifespan of plants and their organs is still fragmentary. Senescence is mainly characterized by a decline in the photosynthetic activity of leaves, which is highly sensitive to diverse stress factors. Consequently, senescence processes are promoted by adverse environmental conditions increasing in frequency and intensity by the global climate change. Therefore, an integrated view on the factors determining senescence in plants and on developmental and stress-related underlying regulatory pathways is required. Research in this area will provide the basis for establishing novel ways for breeding new crop varieties with improved productivity and enhanced stress resistance in a changing environment.

Scientists working with crop plants in the area of senescence are invited to present their latest results in the Special Issue “Senescence of Crop Plants”. In particular, manuscripts on the regulation of stress induced senescence and on comparisons of crop cultivars with regard to senescence, stress tolerance and productivity in various environmental settings are welcome. In addition to results of original research, reviews will also be considered.

Prof. Karin Krupinska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photosynthetic duration
  • functional stay green cultivars
  • production of biomass, crop yield
  • nutrient remobilization
  • global climate change
  • environmental control of senescence
  • stress induced senescence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Drought Stress-Related Physiological Changes and Histone Modifications in Barley Primary Leaves at HSP17 Gene
Received: 18 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 17 June 2017
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Abstract
Stress-inducible genes undergo epigenetic modifications under stress conditions. To investigate if HSP17, of which transcripts accumulate in plant cells under stress, is regulated through epigenetic mechanisms under drought stress, 5-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Carina) plants were subjected to progressive drought [...] Read more.
Stress-inducible genes undergo epigenetic modifications under stress conditions. To investigate if HSP17, of which transcripts accumulate in plant cells under stress, is regulated through epigenetic mechanisms under drought stress, 5-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Carina) plants were subjected to progressive drought through water withholding for 22 days. Changes in physiological status and expression of HSP17 gene were monitored in primary leaves of control and drought-treated plants every two days. Twelve days after drought started, control and drought-treated plants were analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation using antibodies against three histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2) and H3 itself. Already after four days of drought treatment, stomatal conductance was severely decreased. Thereafter, maximum and quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII), regulated and non-regulated energy dissipation in PSII, and later also chlorophyll content, were affected by drought, indicating the stress-induced onset of senescence. At the 12th day of drought, before leaf water content declined, expression of HSP17 gene was increased two-fold in drought-treated plants compared to the controls. Twelve days of drought caused an increase in H3 and a loss in H3K9me2 not only at HSP17, but also at constitutively transcribed reference genes ACTIN, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (pp2A), and at silent regions BM9, CEREBA. In contrast, H3K4me3 showed a specific increase at HSP17 gene at the beginning and the middle part of the coding region, indicating that this mark is critical for the drought-responsive transcription status of a gene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Senescence of Crop Plants)
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Open AccessArticle Development of a Statistical Crop Model to Explain the Relationship between Seed Yield and Phenotypic Diversity within the Brassica napus Genepool
Received: 30 March 2017 / Revised: 14 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 22 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5213 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Plants are extremely versatile organisms that respond to the environment in which they find themselves, but a large part of their development is under genetic regulation. The links between developmental parameters and yield are poorly understood in oilseed rape; understanding this relationship will [...] Read more.
Plants are extremely versatile organisms that respond to the environment in which they find themselves, but a large part of their development is under genetic regulation. The links between developmental parameters and yield are poorly understood in oilseed rape; understanding this relationship will help growers to predict their yields more accurately and breeders to focus on traits that may lead to yield improvements. To determine the relationship between seed yield and other agronomic traits, we investigated the natural variation that already exists with regards to resource allocation in 37 lines of the crop species Brassica napus. Over 130 different traits were assessed; they included seed yield parameters, seed composition, leaf mineral analysis, rates of pod and leaf senescence and plant architecture traits. A stepwise regression analysis was used to model statistically the measured traits with seed yield per plant. Above-ground biomass and protein content together accounted for 94.36% of the recorded variation. The primary raceme area, which was highly correlated with yield parameters (0.65), provides an early indicator of potential yield. The pod and leaf photosynthetic and senescence parameters measured had only a limited influence on seed yield and were not correlated with each other, indicating that reproductive development is not necessarily driving the senescence process within field-grown B. napus. Assessing the diversity that exists within the B. napus gene pool has highlighted architectural, seed and mineral composition traits that should be targeted in breeding programmes through the development of linked markers to improve crop yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Senescence of Crop Plants)
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Open AccessArticle Metabolite Profiling for Leaf Senescence in Barley Reveals Decreases in Amino Acids and Glycolysis Intermediates
Received: 10 January 2017 / Revised: 26 January 2017 / Accepted: 6 February 2017 / Published: 17 February 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1499 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Leaf senescence is a long developmental phase important for plant performance and nutrient management. Cell constituents are recycled in old leaves to provide nutrients that are redistributed to the sink organs. Up to now, metabolomic changes during leaf senescence have been mainly studied [...] Read more.
Leaf senescence is a long developmental phase important for plant performance and nutrient management. Cell constituents are recycled in old leaves to provide nutrients that are redistributed to the sink organs. Up to now, metabolomic changes during leaf senescence have been mainly studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.). The metabolite profiling conducted in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) during primary leaf senescence under two nitrate regimes and in flag leaf shows that amino acids, hexose, sucrose and glycolysis intermediates decrease during senescence, while minor carbohydrates accumulate. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds changed with senescence only in primary leaves. The senescence-related metabolite changes in the flag leaf were globally similar to those observed in primary leaves. The effect of senescence on the metabolite changes of barley leaves was similar to that previously described in Arabidopsis except for sugars and glycolysis compounds. This suggests a different role of sugars in the control of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis and in barley. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Senescence of Crop Plants)
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