Special Issue "Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alfonso Albacete
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute for Agri-Food Research and Development of Murcia (IMIDA), Department of Plant Production and Agrotechnology, C/ Mayor s/n, E-30150 La Alberca, Murcia, Spain
Interests: abiotic stress; root-to-shoot signaling; source-sink relationships; plant hormones; adaptive responses of plant metabolome; food security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant hormones are naturally occurring molecules responsible for many aspects of plant growth and development, and are especially important in crop plants. Environmental signals trigger the production of these powerful compounds, which are produced in different plant organs depending on which hormone is called into action. Therefore, hormones play critical roles in response to biotic and abiotic stressors, such as pests, diseases, drought, salinity, nutrient imbalances, and extreme temperatures. Although hormones are naturally occurring in plants, some specific hormones can be also synthetically produced for exogenous application to crops. The ways in which crop plants generate, transport, and regulate both the local and long-distance hormone-based chemical signals that influence plant growth and production are important research targets. This Special Issue is intended to present novel research on the role of plant hormones in crop physiology, and yield and stress responses. In particular, submissions will be invited on the following topics (other related topics can be also accepted): (1) hormone signaling in crop plants, (2) hormone regulation of crop plant growth and production, (3) influence of plant hormones on crop plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and (4) exogenous hormone applications and hormone-based biostimulants to improve crop plant physiology and yield.

Dr. Alfonso Albacete
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant hormones
  • hormone signaling
  • crop production
  • biotic and abiotic stresses
  • biostimulants

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Use of Red Shade Nets Improves Growth in Salinized Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Plants by Regulating Their Ion Homeostasis and Hormone Balance
Agronomy 2020, 10(11), 1766; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111766 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 601
Abstract
The actual climate crisis scenario is aggravating the abiotic stress episodes that crop plants have to face. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses directly impairing plant growth and productivity. Several strategies have been developed to minimize the negative effects of [...] Read more.
The actual climate crisis scenario is aggravating the abiotic stress episodes that crop plants have to face. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses directly impairing plant growth and productivity. Several strategies have been developed to minimize the negative effects of salinity in agricultural industry, mainly at the plant level, while management strategies, such us the control of microclimate conditions and light quality over plant canopy, have also been used. Indeed, shading plants with photoselective nets has been considered an efficient management strategy to modulate solar radiation to improve crop productivity. The aim of this work was to gain insights about the physiological factors underlying the salinity-alleviating effect of using red shading nets. For that, pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown under control (0 mM NaCl) and moderate salinity (35 mM NaCl) conditions, with half of the plants covered with a red net (30% shading). The shoot growth impairment provoked by salinity was in part minimized by shading plants with red nets, which can be explained by their higher capacity to exclude Na+, control of K+ homeostasis and regulation of hormonal balance. Indeed, the concentrations of the most active cytokinin in pepper, trans-zeatin, as well as its metabolic precursor, zeatin riboside, increased in shaded plants, associated to shoot growth recovery and photosynthetic rate maintenance under salinity. Furthermore, the stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA) increased with salinity but in a lower extend in the plants shaded with red nets, suggesting a fine tune of stomata opening by ABA which, in crosstalk with salicylic acid increment, improved plant water relations. Likewise, the concentrations of gibberellins and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, also changed during salinity stress in shaded plants but those changes were uncoupled of growth responses as indicated by the principal component analysis and thus they seem to play a minor role. Our data demonstrate that shading pepper plants with red nets is an efficient management strategy to modulate microclimate conditions at crop level thus controlling the ion homeostasis and hormonal balance of the plant to cope with salinity stress. This is especially important due to the actual and expected changes of the global climatic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants)
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Article
CAX1a TILLING Mutations Modify the Hormonal Balance Controlling Growth and Ion Homeostasis in Brassica rapa Plants Subjected to Salinity
Agronomy 2020, 10(11), 1699; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111699 - 03 Nov 2020
Viewed by 467
Abstract
Salinity is a serious issue for crops, as it causes remarkable yield losses. The accumulation of Na+ affects plant physiology and produces nutrient imbalances. Plants trigger signaling cascades in response to stresses in which phytohormones and Ca2+ are key components. Cation/H [...] Read more.
Salinity is a serious issue for crops, as it causes remarkable yield losses. The accumulation of Na+ affects plant physiology and produces nutrient imbalances. Plants trigger signaling cascades in response to stresses in which phytohormones and Ca2+ are key components. Cation/H+ exchangers (CAXs) transporters are involved in Ca2+ fluxes in cells. Thus, enhanced CAX activity could improve tolerance to salinity stress. Using the TILLING (targeting induced local lesions in genomes) technique, three Brassica rapa mutants were generated through a single amino acidic modification in the CAX1a transporter. We hypothesized that BraA.cax1a mutations could modify the hormonal balance, leading to improved salinity tolerance. To test this hypothesis, the mutants and the parental line R-o-18 were grown under saline conditions (150 mM NaCl), and leaf and root biomass, ion concentrations, and phytohormone profile were analyzed. Under saline conditions, BraA.cax1a-4 mutant plants increased growth compared to the parental line, which was associated with reduced Na+ accumulation. Further, it increased K+ concentration and changed the hormonal balance. Specifically, our results show that higher indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin (GA) concentrations in mutant plants could promote growth under saline conditions, while abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and jasmonic acid (JA) led to better signaling stress responses and water use efficiency. Therefore, CAX1 mutations directly influence the hormonal balance of the plant controlling growth and ion homeostasis under salinity. Thus, Ca2+ signaling manipulation can be used as a strategy to improve salinity tolerance in breeding programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants)
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Article
Phytohormone Profiles of Lettuce and Pepper Grown Aeroponically with Elevated Root-Zone Carbon Dioxide Concentrations
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 665; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050665 - 09 May 2020
Viewed by 737
Abstract
Enhancing root-zone (RZ) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) levels of plants grown aeroponically can increase biomass accumulation but may also alter phytohormone profiles in planta. These experiments investigated how CO2 gas (1500 ppm) added to an aeroponic system affected phytohormone concentrations of [...] Read more.
Enhancing root-zone (RZ) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) levels of plants grown aeroponically can increase biomass accumulation but may also alter phytohormone profiles in planta. These experiments investigated how CO2 gas (1500 ppm) added to an aeroponic system affected phytohormone concentrations of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. Phytohormonal profiling of root and leaf tissues revealed a solitary treatment difference in lettuce plants, an increased shoot jasmonic acid (JA) concentration under elevated RZ CO2. Since JA is considered a growth inhibitor, growth promotion of lettuce under elevated RZ CO2 does not seem related to its phytohormone profile. On the other hand, pepper plants showed changes in foliar phytohormone (aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, ACC, trans-zeatin, tZ and salicylic acid, SA) concentrations, which were correlated with decreased leaf growth in some experiments. Foliar accumulation of ACC alongside decreased leaf tZ concentrations may mask a positive effect of elevated RZ CO2 on pepper growth. Diverse phytohormone responses to elevated RZ CO2 between different species may be involved in their different growth responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants)
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Article
Identification and Expression Analysis of the PIN and AUX/LAX Gene Families in Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaud)
Agronomy 2019, 9(8), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9080435 - 07 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1056
Abstract
Auxin regulates diverse aspects of growth and development. Furthermore, polar auxin transport, which is mediated by the PIN-FORMED (PIN) and AUXIN1/LIKE-AUX (AUX/LAX) proteins, plays a crucial role in auxin distribution. In this study, six PIN and four AUX/LAX genes were identified in ramie [...] Read more.
Auxin regulates diverse aspects of growth and development. Furthermore, polar auxin transport, which is mediated by the PIN-FORMED (PIN) and AUXIN1/LIKE-AUX (AUX/LAX) proteins, plays a crucial role in auxin distribution. In this study, six PIN and four AUX/LAX genes were identified in ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.). We used qRT-PCR to characterize and analyze the two gene families, including phylogenetic relationships, intron/exon structures, cis-elements, subcellular localization, and the expression patterns in different tissues. The expression of these genes in response to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) treatment and drought stress was also assessed; the results indicate that most of the BnAUX/LAX and BnPIN genes were regulated as a result of IAA treatment and drought stress. Our study provides insights into ramie auxin transporters and lays the foundation for further analysis of their biological functions in ramie fiber development and adaptation to environmental stresses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants)
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Review

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Review
Interaction between Humic Substances and Plant Hormones for Phosphorous Acquisition
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 640; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050640 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1511
Abstract
Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a major constraint in highly weathered tropical soils. Although phosphorous rock reserves may last for several hundred years, there exists an urgent need to research efficient P management for sustainable agriculture. Plant hormones play an important role in regulating [...] Read more.
Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a major constraint in highly weathered tropical soils. Although phosphorous rock reserves may last for several hundred years, there exists an urgent need to research efficient P management for sustainable agriculture. Plant hormones play an important role in regulating plant growth, development, and reproduction. Humic substances (HS) are not only considered an essential component of soil organic carbon (SOC), but also well known as a biostimulant which can perform phytohormone-like activities to induce nutrient uptake. This review paper presents an overview of the scientific outputs in the relationship between HS and plant hormones. Special attention will be paid to the interaction between HS and plant hormones for nutrient uptake under P-deficient conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Signaling and Regulation in Cultivated Plants)
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