Special Issue "Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in Cropping Systems"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stuart Smyth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Interests: GM crops; regulation; innovation; sustainability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

2019 marks the 25th year of the production of genetically modified (GM) crops. With billions of cumulative acres of GM crops planted in this time frame, in over 30 different countries, by nearly 20 million farmers per year, the impacts have been significant. Adoption began in developed countries, but rapidly expanded to numerous developing countries the globe over. As the number of GM crop varieties has increased from the first four varieties of canola, corn, cotton and soybeans, there are now multiple other GM crops, fruits and vegetables being presently produced. GM crops have become a consistent part of crop rotations on farms that range in size from tens of thousands of acres to a few acres. The transition of GM crops in many crop varieties has transformed many aspects of agricultural supply chains. This call for submission to a Special Issue of Agronomy on "GMOs in Cropping Systems" seeks papers related to all aspects of GM crop production. The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2019.

Dr. Stuart Smyth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • herbicide tolerance
  • insect resistance
  • virus resistance
  • bioinoculants
  • biofertilizers
  • herbicide resistance
  • economic impacts
  • environmental impacts
  • land-use changes
  • changes in chemical-use

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Farmers’ Preferences for Cotton Cultivation Characteristics: A Discrete Choice Experiment in Burkina Faso
Agronomy 2019, 9(12), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9120841 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
While a fierce debate about the advantages and disadvantages of genetically modified crops is ongoing, it is surprising that farmers are often not consulted. In Burkina Faso, where insect resistant Bollgard II® cotton (further termed Bt cotton) was commercially released in 2008, [...] Read more.
While a fierce debate about the advantages and disadvantages of genetically modified crops is ongoing, it is surprising that farmers are often not consulted. In Burkina Faso, where insect resistant Bollgard II® cotton (further termed Bt cotton) was commercially released in 2008, studies highlight that cotton producers are in general satisfied with the reduction in insecticide use while the economic benefits are a source of controversy. To gain insight into farmers’ preferences towards attributes in cotton cultivation, a discrete choice experiment (DCE) was developed. Five key attributes were identified to describe improved cotton varieties: seed development and provenance, seed costs, yield, required number of insecticide sprays, and preservation of agricultural practices. Farm-gate surveys were conducted among 324 cotton farmers in Western Burkina Faso. The results show that overall, farmers have a positive preference towards yield improvements and a negative preference towards pure private seed development and towards an increase in the requested number of insecticide applications or in the seed costs. According to their varieties at the time of the surveys (Bt and non-Bt), a difference was observed regarding their preferences for a status quo situation, indicating that those growing Bt had a stronger preference to keep the status quo than non-Bt farmers. When dividing the sample in segments based on the farm size, it was shown that there were different preferences with respect to the development of the variety and the required number of insecticide applications. Overall, it can be concluded from this study that economic benefits (linked to higher yields, lower seed costs, or reduced pesticide use) shape farmer’s preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in Cropping Systems)
Open AccessArticle
Farmers’ Willingness to Adopt Late Blight-Resistant Genetically Modified Potatoes
Agronomy 2019, 9(6), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9060280 - 31 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops remains highly contested in the European Union (EU). While research has mainly focused on public and consumer opinions, few studies have investigated farmers’ reactions towards such crops. This study aims to determine farmers’ willingness to adopt [...] Read more.
The commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops remains highly contested in the European Union (EU). While research has mainly focused on public and consumer opinions, few studies have investigated farmers’ reactions towards such crops. This study aims to determine farmers’ willingness to adopt a late blight-resistant (LBR) GM potato cultivar (Bintje) in Flanders, Belgium (n = 384). The findings demonstrate that more than half (54.7%) of the farmers have the intention to adopt this GM potato if it becomes available. Farmers’ willingness to adopt is mainly influenced by ethical concerns about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) (negative) and perceived economic benefits of LBR GM potatoes (positive). Knowledge about GM technology decreases the likelihood of being indifferent, as compared to being willing to adopt or being opposed. As such, efforts to improve knowledge alone would not be considered an effective strategy to improve adoption rates among farmers. Socio-economic concerns about GMOs, environmental benefit perceptions of LBR GM potatoes, and socio-demographic and farm variables were not significant as potential determinants of farmers’ likelihood to adopt this GM potato. Our findings lend support to a potentially favorable climate to introduce this GM potato in Flanders, Belgium, an EU region where opt-out measures to restrict cultivation of approved GM crops were not taken. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in Cropping Systems)
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