Special Issue "Industrial Ecology and Innovation"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Raffaella Taddeo

Department of Economic Studies, “G. D'Annunzio” University of Chieti–Pescara, 65127 Pescara, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: industrial ecology; industrial symbiosis; eco-industrial development; lean and cleaner production; green and circular economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Industrial Ecology (IE) is as a broad and interdisciplinary field of research, focused on environmental, economic and social improvements in production and consumption activities. It proposes theoretical approaches, organization and management strategies, and government policies aimed to ensure environmental safeguards and quality of life. Innovation studies concern the nature and dynamics of changes that characterize the economic world, focusing on the capacities and limitations of innovations to achieve socio-economic transformations.

It is now recognized that the two concepts are intrinsically related. As early as 2008, Green and Randles, in their book entitled “Industrial Ecology and Spaces of Innovation” [1] brought to light such a close proximity and the potential arising from their joint investigation. According to the authors, innovation studies should consider how innovations transform socio-economic systems (including those changes involving natural environment), while IE should shape socio-economic systems “metaphorically” as ecological systems, through a set of concepts and techniques that include technological and organisational innovations. They also acknowledge that, despite innovation is central to achieving sustainable production and consumption, studies on innovation were not systematically engaged in the IE community at that time.

Ten years later, important progresses have been made and IE and Innovation can offer very powerful opportunities to design a new paradigm of sustainability, especially in the recent framework of Circular Economy, considering both the origins (from individual initiatives, to companies and sectors, up to systems of innovation), the applicative contexts (from products to processes, supply chains and the whole economic system) and the conceptual declinations (eco-innovation, systemic innovations, etc.) of the phenomenon.

All submissions will be free of charge once accepted.

Reference

1. Green, K.; Randles, S. At the interface of innovation studies and industrial ecology. In Industrial Ecology and Spaces of Innovation; Green, K., Randles, S., Eds.; Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK, 2002.

Dr. Raffaella Taddeo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Administrative Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Circular Economy
  • Green Economy
  • Eco-Innovation
  • Technological Innovation for Industrial Ecology
  • Social Innovation for Industrial Ecology
  • Systemic Innovation
  • Eco-Industrial Development
  • Industrial Symbiosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Life Cycle Assessment of Honey: Considering the Pollination Service
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9010027
Received: 17 January 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used for the improvement of the environmental performance of products and services, including food systems. Amongst them, however, honey appears to have been rarely analysed. Furthermore, the pollination by honeybees can be regarded as one of [...] Read more.
Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used for the improvement of the environmental performance of products and services, including food systems. Amongst them, however, honey appears to have been rarely analysed. Furthermore, the pollination by honeybees can be regarded as one of the functions of an apiculture system and is of utmost importance both for natural ecosystems and agriculture. When implementing an LCA of an apiculture system, the pollination service can and should be considered as one of the functions of a multifunctional system and the issue of how to deal with this multifunctionality in the modelling of that system should be considered carefully. The aim of this paper is to explore the economic value of pollination as a potential basis for managing multifunctionality in LCA modelling as well as its implementation in a case study. Economic allocation was performed between the pollination service and honey production. The results demonstrated that the production phase is the most impactful one for most of the environmental categories (due to the use of glass for the honey jars and electricity consumption during the storage of supers in refrigerator rooms), followed by the distribution phase. Finally, the most affected environmental impact category appeared to be natural land transformation, followed by marine ecotoxicity, freshwater eutrophication and human toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Ecology and Innovation)
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Open AccessArticle The Commitment of Packaging Industry in the Framework of the European Strategy for Plastics in a Circular Economy
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9010018
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 February 2019 / Published: 17 February 2019
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Abstract
European Commission is strongly committed into issues related to plastic materials production and plastic waste management. While the Circular Economy Package has set targets generally referred to recycling rates, the European Strategy for plastics in a circular economy (and related action plan), fosters [...] Read more.
European Commission is strongly committed into issues related to plastic materials production and plastic waste management. While the Circular Economy Package has set targets generally referred to recycling rates, the European Strategy for plastics in a circular economy (and related action plan), fosters sustainability along the entire plastic value chain: from primary producers to converters, brand owners and retailers to waste collectors and recyclers. The Directive on the reduction of the impact of certain plastic products on the environment (more commonly known as Directive on Single-Use-Plastics, waiting for publication in the Official Journal of the European Union) rules targets on ten plastic products most often found as littering on global beaches, directly affecting plastic industry and, consequently, market. Policy makers and industrial stakeholders are called upon to collaborate. The article aims to illustrate interactions between European Commission and all plastic value chain stakeholders on implementing measures to reach ambitious targets pursued by the recent European policy. The study shows how European Commission has robustly worked to regulate production and consumption patterns on plastic carrier bags and packaging (including food packaging) thus facilitating the achievement of specific targets provided by the recent Directive. However, additional provisions concerning market restriction have been introduced; industrial stakeholders carried on a prompt response by promoting the creation of alliances, join venture and association, as well as a more integrated plastic value chain. On the base of this purpose, a virtuous example of a closed supply chain is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Ecology and Innovation)
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