Special Issue "Indoor Soundscape: Integrating Sound, Experience and Architecture"

A special issue of Acoustics (ISSN 2624-599X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Papatya Nur Dökmeci Yörükoğlu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Interior Architecture, School of Architecture, Cankaya University, Ankara, Turkey
Interests: soundscape; architectural acoustics; subjective ratings of livingscapes; indoor environmental quality and management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The indoor soundscape framework includes built entities, sound environments, and the contextual experience of the user. This condensation of different aspects in one totalitarian approach has led to the design of this new research field. Through this perspective, users and their interactions with their environment become a dominant part of the evaluation process. These interactions reveal the details of how a space is used and perceived by occupants. In addition, spatial characteristics are very important for indoor sound environments and how sound behaves within a particular enclosure. Indeed, an enclosure is defined by walls, floor, and ceiling to be considered as an “indoor” space. Therefore, architectural and room acoustics theories provide an important base for understanding indoor sound behavior. Therefore, architectural characteristics, objective sound analysis, and subjective assessment of user perception and experience, together, show an overall approach addressing all variables of the indoor soundscaping framework.

This Special Issue aims to include original research that concentrates on soundscape analysis of indoor spaces, soundscape design of enclosed or semi-enclosed public spaces, acoustic comfort assessment of users, and the effects of architectural elements on overall sound environments. Methods on psychoacoustic and temporal analysis of sound environment and soundscape perception analysis through questionnaires and interviews are within the scope of this Special Issue. Studies concentrating on the different measurement and analysis methods of the sound environment and human perception, in addition to studies on enclosed private and public spaces, such as transportation, residential, educational, and recreational buildings, as well as health care facilities, offices, restaurants, and shopping spaces, are all welcome.

Prof. Jian Kang
Dr. Papatya Nur Dökmeci Yörükoğlu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Acoustics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soundscape of enclosed and semi-enclosed environments
  • Effects of architectural elements on acoustic formations
  • Improving the quality of indoor livingscape for the users
  • Archisonic analysis
  • Acoustic comfort in public spaces
  • Quality of experience within built environments
  • Indoor soundscaping methods and tools
  • Questionnaire design and indoor soundwalks
  • Recording, measurement, and modeling of indoor sound environments

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparing Turkish and European Noise Management and Soundscape Policies: A Proposal of Indoor Soundscape Integration to Architectural Design and Application
Acoustics 2019, 1(4), 847-865; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1040051 - 08 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Improving soundscape studies and policies states that the soundscape approach, which also considers noise interventions, should replace noise management. However, a considerable number of soundscape studies have been concerned with the quality of acoustic environments of open and urban public spaces. This study [...] Read more.
Improving soundscape studies and policies states that the soundscape approach, which also considers noise interventions, should replace noise management. However, a considerable number of soundscape studies have been concerned with the quality of acoustic environments of open and urban public spaces. This study focuses on indoor soundscaping and its possible integration into the architectural design and application process. Therefore, the present and ongoing Turkish and European soundscape and noise management policies were evaluated in detail and compared in order to characterize the gap regarding the state of indoor soundscaping between the literature and the policy development level. Furthermore, we identified and classified factors and methods which have an influence on indoor soundscaping to be integrated into the final proposed model. As a result of the detailed evaluation regarding policies and indoor soundscaping principles, five stages were proposed that can be used in an integrated indoor soundscape model: (1) the establishment of a topic specific institution or working group on indoor soundscaping; (2) the preparation of a standard that includes definitions, indoor soundscape factors and methods; (3) the preparation of an indoor soundscape directive; (4) the preparation of indoor soundscape guidelines; and (5) the provision of maintenance and supervision by experts and authorities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Soundscape: Integrating Sound, Experience and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
Commissioning the Acoustical Performance of an Open Office Space Following the Latest Healthy Building Standard: A Case Study
Acoustics 2019, 1(3), 473-492; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1030027 - 09 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Healthy building design guides are cogent and necessary. While elements that contribute to healthy buildings are multifactorial, the perception of sound versus noise is subjective and difficult to operationalize. To inform the commissioning process, the acoustics in an open office was examined following [...] Read more.
Healthy building design guides are cogent and necessary. While elements that contribute to healthy buildings are multifactorial, the perception of sound versus noise is subjective and difficult to operationalize. To inform the commissioning process, the acoustics in an open office was examined following the first international building certification system that focuses on the well-being of occupants. Results highlight the role facility managers play in ensuring acoustical quality and offer suggestions to optimize healthy building rating systems. Mixed empirical evidence concerning the advantages of open office designs exists, as does evidence that noise, and a lack of privacy, affects workers’ levels of distraction and dissatisfaction. Sound masking systems can lower stress levels and augment performance. However, the sound produced by these systems can also be disruptive; conflicting information exists for facility managers to use when making decisions. The results suggest that, although objective measurements and healthy building guidelines for designing satisfactory indoor acoustic environments are important, changes to the physical environment, and acoustical systems, in particular, require iterative subjective assessments within the retrofit process to bolster occupant satisfaction. Mixed-methodologies used in this study may aid facilities managers in capturing and interpreting occupant data about physical stimuli in the workplace and improving the commissioning process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Soundscape: Integrating Sound, Experience and Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle
An Enhanced Temporal Feature Integration Method for Environmental Sound Recognition
Acoustics 2019, 1(2), 410-422; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1020023 - 08 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Temporal feature integration refers to a set of strategies attempting to capture the information conveyed in the temporal evolution of the signal. It has been extensively applied in the context of semantic audio showing performance improvements against the standard frame-based audio classification methods. [...] Read more.
Temporal feature integration refers to a set of strategies attempting to capture the information conveyed in the temporal evolution of the signal. It has been extensively applied in the context of semantic audio showing performance improvements against the standard frame-based audio classification methods. This paper investigates the potential of an enhanced temporal feature integration method to classify environmental sounds. The proposed method utilizes newly introduced integration functions that capture the texture window shape in combination with standard functions like mean and standard deviation in a classification scheme of 10 environmental sound classes. The results obtained from three classification algorithms exhibit an increase in recognition accuracy against a standard temporal integration with simple statistics, which reveals the discriminative ability of the new metrics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Soundscape: Integrating Sound, Experience and Architecture)
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