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J. Clin. Transl. Ophthalmol., Volume 1, Issue 3 (September 2023) – 3 articles

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6 pages, 498 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Antiopioid State Laws on Prescribing Patterns in an Oculoplastic Practice
by Elahhe Afkhamnejad, Cooper Stevenson and Praveena Gupta
J. Clin. Transl. Ophthalmol. 2023, 1(3), 91-96; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcto1030011 - 18 Aug 2023
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Abstract
This study aimed to find out whether three Texas state policies restricting opioid prescriptions have influenced the prescribing patterns of the oculoplastic department at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). This is a retrospective chart review of 520 patients at UTMB between [...] Read more.
This study aimed to find out whether three Texas state policies restricting opioid prescriptions have influenced the prescribing patterns of the oculoplastic department at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). This is a retrospective chart review of 520 patients at UTMB between 2019 and 2021, reporting the amount of morphine milliequivalents (MMEs) prescribed to patients undergoing one of eight oculoplastic procedures before and after passage of each state policy. Of 520 patients, 218 received opioids. There were no changes in MMEs/month after the first policy (95% CI: −0.1531–0.1256, p = 0.85), second policy (95% CI: −0.000997–0.00093, p = 0.97), or third policy (95% CI: −0.001431–0.00164, p = 0.096). The passage and implementation of three Texas state antiopioid policies were not associated with significant changes in opioid prescribing patterns following oculoplastic and orbital surgeries at UTMB. Average MMEs/month were driven by orbital-floor fractures, which composed most procedures overall. Limitations included the small population and that only a single provider was reviewed. Future studies would be beneficial in further evaluating the role of state legislation on opioid prescribing patterns and usage among patients. Full article
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12 pages, 4108 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Effect of Substance P with Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I on Epithelial Migration of the Transformed Human Corneal Epithelial Cells (SV-40)
by Phat Tran, Jonathan Kopel and Ted W. Reid
J. Clin. Transl. Ophthalmol. 2023, 1(3), 79-90; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcto1030010 - 17 Jul 2023
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Abstract
On the cornea, daily epithelial resurfacing is a critical process to prevent the loss of normal function, ocular morbidity, corneal structure, and vision loss. There are several components to wound healing, including cellular attachment, migration, and growth. To develop a treatment for corneal [...] Read more.
On the cornea, daily epithelial resurfacing is a critical process to prevent the loss of normal function, ocular morbidity, corneal structure, and vision loss. There are several components to wound healing, including cellular attachment, migration, and growth. To develop a treatment for corneal epithelial healing, we studied the effect of substance P (SP) on corneal epithelial cell migration using a cell culture system of either transformed human corneal epithelial cells (SV-40), or rabbit corneal epithelial cells (SIRC). We investigated the effect of SP with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1). We found that SP is synergistic with insulin and IGF-1 on the stimulation of transformed human corneal epithelial migration in a cell culture system, as well as in rabbit SIRC cells. The addition of either SP, insulin, or IGF-1 alone did not greatly affect epithelial migration, while the combination of SP and insulin or SP and IGF-1 markedly stimulated epithelial migration in a dose-dependent manner. The synergistic effects of SP with insulin and SP with IGF-1 were inhibited by the addition of the SP-specific inhibitor (CP96345). However, the effect of insulin and IGF-1 alone were not inhibited by the NK-1-specific inhibitor (CP96345). Our results are consistent with the need for the involvement of the neuropeptide SP in corneal epithelial wound healing of diabetic corneas where nerve-ending dropout occurs. Additionally, almost identical results were obtained with human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells. These results suggest that the maintenance of the normal integrity of the corneal epithelium might be regulated by both humoral and neural factors. Full article
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7 pages, 1402 KiB  
Case Report
Cataract Surgery following Corneal Allogenic Intrastromal Ring Segments and Implantable Collamer Lens
by Arsalan Akbar Ali, Bobby Saenz and Taj Nasser
J. Clin. Transl. Ophthalmol. 2023, 1(3), 72-78; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcto1030009 - 26 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1559
Abstract
The management of cataracts in keratoconus patients poses a challenge due to the irregular corneal shape and variability in corneal topography, which may lead to errors in determining corneal power. In this report, we present a case of a 48-year-old male with a [...] Read more.
The management of cataracts in keratoconus patients poses a challenge due to the irregular corneal shape and variability in corneal topography, which may lead to errors in determining corneal power. In this report, we present a case of a 48-year-old male with a history of keratoconus and prior Visian Implantable Collamer lenses and Corneal Allogenic Intrastromal Ring Segments procedures, who presented with a nuclear cataract in his right eye. To address this patient’s complex case, he underwent ICL explantation, cataract extraction, and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, utilizing the Johnson & Johnson Sensar AR40 monofocal 3-piece lens with a power of −9.5. The Barrett True K formula predicted a spherical equivalent of −1.76, and at the post-operative one-month follow-up, the uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was 20/60, with pinhole improvement to 20/50. The manifest refraction was −2.50–3.25 × 145, and the best corrected visual acuity was 20/25. This case report highlights the unique challenges encountered in managing keratoconus patients with a history of prior ICL and CAIRS procedures, followed by cataract extraction. Our findings underscore the importance of a comprehensive approach in the management of progressive keratoconus and cataracts to ensure optimal outcomes. Full article
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