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Int. J. Neonatal Screen., Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2016)

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Open AccessMeeting Report
23rd Annual Meeting of the German Society for Newborn Screening (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neugeborenenscreening, DGNS)
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2016, 2(3), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns2030007 - 29 Aug 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1457
Abstract
From 3–4 June, 2016, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the German Society for Newborn Screening (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neugeborenenscreening, DGNS) was held at the University Hospital Heidelberg. The meeting was organized by PD Dr. med. Gwendolyn Gramer (conference president) from the Newborn [...] Read more.
From 3–4 June, 2016, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the German Society for Newborn Screening (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neugeborenenscreening, DGNS) was held at the University Hospital Heidelberg. The meeting was organized by PD Dr. med. Gwendolyn Gramer (conference president) from the Newborn Screening Centreat the University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Prof. Dr. med. Prof. h.c. mult. (RCH) Georg F. Hoffmann, PD Dr. phil. nat. Jürgen G. Okun and PD Dr. med. Gwendolyn Gramer formed the scientific board for the selection of presentations. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Oxygen Saturation Reference Value by Percutaneous Pulse Oximetry in Asymptomatic Newborn Babies in Nigeria: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2016, 2(3), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns2030006 - 18 Aug 2016
Viewed by 1258
Abstract
About 1/4 of all neonatal deaths in Nigeria are caused by birth asphyxia. Normal values of oxygen saturation vary according to regional altitudes. They are important for the screening of cyanotic congenital heart diseases and during newborn resuscitation. There is a dearth of [...] Read more.
About 1/4 of all neonatal deaths in Nigeria are caused by birth asphyxia. Normal values of oxygen saturation vary according to regional altitudes. They are important for the screening of cyanotic congenital heart diseases and during newborn resuscitation. There is a dearth of such information in Nigeria. We determined reference values for oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in asymptomatic newborns aged ≤7 days in Enugu at an altitude of 180 m. The study was cross-sectional. Neonates weighing ≥1500 g at birth were enrolled consecutively. Pre-and post-ductal oxygen saturation was measured using a Datex-Ohmeda Tuffsat® pulse oximeter with neonatal probes. Five hundred and fourteen babies comprising of 24 (4.4%) preterm and 490 (95.3%) term neonates were studied. The mean pre-ductal SpO2 of all babies was 96.1% ± 1.4% and higher than mean post-ductal SpO2 of 95.9% ± 1.4% (p = 0.022). The mean pre-ductal SpO2 were 96.1% ± 1.5% and 96.1% ± 1.3%, (p = 1.000) for males and females, respectively. The mean pre-ductal SpO2 values were higher than the mean post-ductal SpO2 for the corresponding post-natal ages. Full article
Open AccessMeeting Report
ISNS 9th International Symposium, The Hague, The Netherlands, September 11–14, 2016
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2016, 2(3), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns2030005 - 05 Aug 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1455 | Correction
Abstract
The International Society for Neonatal Screening (ISNS) was established almost 30 years ago by a small group of international pioneers in the newborn screening field.[...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
A Novel Approach to Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) Screening at Moderate Altitude
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2016, 2(3), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns2030004 - 20 Jul 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2553
Abstract
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has endorsed Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) screening using pulse oximetry nationwide, but, however, acknowledges that altitude may impact failure rates and alternative algorithms may be required at high altitudes. We therefore evaluated a modified screening protocol [...] Read more.
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has endorsed Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) screening using pulse oximetry nationwide, but, however, acknowledges that altitude may impact failure rates and alternative algorithms may be required at high altitudes. We therefore evaluated a modified screening protocol at an altitude of 6200 feet with the hypothesis that modifications could decrease failure rates. We evaluated 2001 well, newborn infants ≥35 weeks gestation using a modified protocol, which included a lower saturation cutoff for the first screen (85% instead of the AAP recommended 90%) and an oxygen hood intervention between the first two screens. Using our modified screening algorithm, we found a 0.3% failure rate, which was similar to the 0.2% sea-level rate and statistically different from the 1.1% rate identified in a recent study at similar altitude. Had the AAP protocol been used, the failure rate would have increased to 0.8%, which is similar to prior reports near this altitude. Echocardiograms were performed on failing newborns with no CCHD identified. A Birth Defects Registry Database review demonstrated one newborn with CCHD was missed after meeting AAP passing criteria. Overall, this study demonstrates that an alternative algorithm can be implemented at moderate altitude with decreased failure rate and comparable false negative rate. Full article
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Open AccessTechnical Note
A Non-Invasive Strategy for Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia Diagnosis: Newborn Platelet Genotyping with Buccal Swabs
Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2016, 2(3), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns2030003 - 04 Jul 2016
Viewed by 1643
Abstract
Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia results from the maternal immune response against fetal-specific antigens inherited from the father. The diagnosis is ascertained only when the maternal alloantibody and the offending antigen present in the newborn are identified. Up until now most laboratories perform DNA extraction [...] Read more.
Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia results from the maternal immune response against fetal-specific antigens inherited from the father. The diagnosis is ascertained only when the maternal alloantibody and the offending antigen present in the newborn are identified. Up until now most laboratories perform DNA extraction for neonatal genotyping from newborn blood samplings. In order to avoid such an invasive procedure, two protocols of DNA extraction from buccal swabs were developed: a manual protocol using the QIAamp mini blood kit (Qiagen), and an automated procedure with the MagNA Pure Compact instrument (Roche). Both EDTA-blood and buccal swabs from thrombocytopenic newborns were genotyped manually (14 samples), automatically (15 samples) or both manually and automatically (two samples). Human Platelet Antigen (HPA) genotyping was performed using the BeadChip assay (BioArray, Immucor). Concordant genotypings were obtained for all samples except for one swab with the manual method. The automated DNA extraction from newborn buccal swabs with the MagNA Pure Compact instrument was chosen as the first-line strategy, with a significant gain of time in processing buccal swabs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Newborn Screening-Past, Present and Future)
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