Next Article in Journal
Fault-Event Trees Based Probabilistic Safety Analysis of a Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor’s Core Meltdown and Minor Damage Frequencies
Previous Article in Journal
A Novel Method for Safety Analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems—Application to a Ship Exhaust Gas Scrubber System
Open AccessArticle

Roadside Fixed-Object Collisions, Barrier Performance, and Fatal Injuries in Single-Vehicle, Run-Off-Road Crashes

1
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department, Faculty of Transportation Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain PO Box 15551, UAE
2
Graduate Research Assistant, Civil & Environmental Engineering Department, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain PO Box 15551, UAE
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Safety 2020, 6(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety6020027
Received: 8 April 2020 / Revised: 12 May 2020 / Accepted: 14 May 2020 / Published: 20 May 2020
Objectives: To quantify the odds of fatal injuries associated with drivers involved in single-vehicle, run-off-road (SVROR), injury crashes. Methods: An in-service safety evaluation was carried out using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: The odds of motorist death was lower for w-beam guardrail crashes as compared to tree, pole, and concrete barrier crashes. On the other hand, there was no statistically significant difference between the odds of motorist death in concrete barrier crashes as compared to tree or pole crashes. The odds of motorist death were lower for curbs and collision-free crashes as compared to tree, pole, and barrier crashes. Thus, obstacles should be removed whenever possible and barriers installed only whenever absolutely necessary. The lack of vehicle containment (in barrier crashes) was found: (i) to tend to occur on higher-posted-speed-limit roads and result in a higher percentage of fatal crashes, (ii) to be more prevalent with the less rigid barrier type, and (iii) to result in a consistently higher percentage of fatal crashes under the concrete barrier category. Conclusions: Findings not only support state-of-the-art roadside design guidelines and crash-testing criteria, but they may also be useful in evaluating proposed roadside safety improvements. View Full-Text
Keywords: run-off-road crashes; fatal injuries; logistic regression run-off-road crashes; fatal injuries; logistic regression
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Albuquerque, F.D.B.; Awadalla, D.M. Roadside Fixed-Object Collisions, Barrier Performance, and Fatal Injuries in Single-Vehicle, Run-Off-Road Crashes. Safety 2020, 6, 27.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop