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Open AccessConference Report

Clinical, Epidemiological and Experimental Approaches to Assess Adverse Health Outcomes of Indoor Biomass Smoke Exposure: Conclusions from An Indo-Swedish Workshop in Mysuru, January 2020

1
JSS Medical College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Mysuru 570015, India
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Unit of Integrative Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Powai, Mumbai 400076, India
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CSIR—Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysuru 570015, India
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CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032, India
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Foundation for Research and Advocacy in Mental Health, Mysuru 570015, India
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Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edgehill University, Lancashire L39 4QP, UK
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Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxics 2020, 8(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics8030068
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 31 August 2020 / Accepted: 3 September 2020 / Published: 5 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Exposure to Air Pollution on Respiratory Health)
This report summarizes the outcome of a workshop held in Mysuru, India in January 2020 addressing the adverse health effects of exposure to biomass smoke (BMS). The aim of the workshop was to identify uncertainties and gaps in knowledge and possible methods to address them in the Mysuru study on Determinants of Health in Rural Adults (MUDHRA) cohort. Specific aims were to discuss the possibility to improve and introduce new screening methods for exposure and effect, logistic limitations and other potential obstacles, and plausible strategies to overcome these in future studies. Field visits were included in the workshop prior to discussing these issues. The workshop concluded that multi-disciplinary approaches to perform: (a) indoor and personalized exposure assessment; (b) clinical and epidemiological field studies among children, adolescents, and adults; (c) controlled exposure experiments using physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo models to understand molecular patho-mechanisms are warranted to dissect BMS-induced adverse health effects. It was perceived that assessment of dietary exposure (like phytochemical index) may serve as an important indicator for understanding potential protective mechanisms. Well trained field teams and close collaboration with the participating hospital were identified as the key requirements to successfully carry out the study objectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: household air pollution; biomass; COPD; particle; smoke; lung household air pollution; biomass; COPD; particle; smoke; lung
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Padukudru Anand, M.; Larsson, K.; Johanson, G.; Phuleria, H.C.; Ravindra, P.V.; Ernstgård, L.; Mabalirajan, U.; Krishna, M.; Palmberg, L.; Pollitt, K.J.G.; Upadhyay, S.; Ganguly, K. Clinical, Epidemiological and Experimental Approaches to Assess Adverse Health Outcomes of Indoor Biomass Smoke Exposure: Conclusions from An Indo-Swedish Workshop in Mysuru, January 2020. Toxics 2020, 8, 68.

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