Next Article in Journal
Do 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Represent PAH Air Toxicity?
Previous Article in Journal
Revelation of Different Nanoparticle-Uptake Behavior in Two Standard Cell Lines NIH/3T3 and A549 by Flow Cytometry and Time-Lapse Imaging
Article

North Carolina Toxic Substance Incidents Program 2010–2015: Identifying Areas for Injury Prevention Efforts

North Carolina Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (NC OEEB), 5505 Six Forks Rd., Raleigh, NC 27699, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxics 2017, 5(3), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics5030016
Received: 13 July 2017 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 3 August 2017 / Published: 6 August 2017
The National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP) is a surveillance system designed to capture acute toxic substance releases, factors contributing to the release, and any associated injuries. North Carolina has participated since 2010, when NTSIP was established. This article will present a descriptive statistical summary from 2010 to 2015 focused on releases that resulted in injuries in order to identify areas for public health prevention efforts. Of the 1690 toxic releases in North Carolina, 155 incidents resulted in injuries and 500 people were injured. Carbon monoxide injured the greatest number of people. Of the incidents that resulted in injuries, 68 occurred at private vehicles or residences (44%), injuring 124 people (25%). Over half of events where at least one responder was injured occurred at private vehicles or residences. Events occurring at private residences did not have a significant relationship between evacuations and injuries, while for industry-related events, the odds of an evacuation being ordered were 8.18 times greater (OR = 8.18, 95% CI = 5.19, 12.89) when there were injuries associated with an event. Intervention efforts should focus on preventing responder injuries while responding to private residence releases and educating the general public on how to prevent injuries by self-evacuating areas where hazardous chemicals have been released. View Full-Text
Keywords: chemicals; spills; transportation; industry; injuries; evacuation; explosion; carbon monoxide chemicals; spills; transportation; industry; injuries; evacuation; explosion; carbon monoxide
MDPI and ACS Style

Eiffert, S.; Etienne, S.; Hirsch, A.; Langley, R. North Carolina Toxic Substance Incidents Program 2010–2015: Identifying Areas for Injury Prevention Efforts. Toxics 2017, 5, 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics5030016

AMA Style

Eiffert S, Etienne S, Hirsch A, Langley R. North Carolina Toxic Substance Incidents Program 2010–2015: Identifying Areas for Injury Prevention Efforts. Toxics. 2017; 5(3):16. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics5030016

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eiffert, Samantha, Suze Etienne, Annie Hirsch, and Ricky Langley. 2017. "North Carolina Toxic Substance Incidents Program 2010–2015: Identifying Areas for Injury Prevention Efforts" Toxics 5, no. 3: 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics5030016

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop