Next Article in Journal
The Use of Tooth Particles as a Biomaterial in Post-Extraction Sockets. Experimental Study in Dogs
Next Article in Special Issue
Household Income and Children’s Unmet Dental Care Need; Blacks’ Diminished Return
Previous Article in Journal
Oral Dysbiotic Communities and Their Implications in Systemic Diseases
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Dent. J. 2018, 6(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6020011

Socioeconomic Status and Self-Rated Oral Health; Diminished Return among Hispanic Whites

1
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture, and Health (CRECH), School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-2700, MI, USA
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-2700, MI, USA 4250 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, USA
Received: 18 March 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health Disparities Due to Race, Ethnicity, and Class)
Full-Text   |   PDF [294 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]

Abstract

Background. An extensive body of knowledge has documented weaker health effects of socio-economic status (SES) for Blacks compared to Whites, a phenomenon also known as Blacks’ diminished return. It is, however, unknown whether the same diminished return also holds for other ethnic minorities such as Hispanics or not. Aim. Using a nationally representative sample, the current study aimed to compare Non-Hispanic and Hispanic Whites for the effects of SES on self-rated oral health. Methods. For the current cross-sectional study, we used data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001–2003. With a nationally representative sampling, CPES included 11,207 adults who were either non-Hispanic Whites (n = 7587) or Hispanic Whites (n = 3620. The dependent variable was self-rated oral health, treated as dichotomous measure. Independent variables were education, income, employment, and marital status. Ethnicity was the focal moderator. Age and gender were covariates. Logistic regressions were used for data analysis. Results. Education, income, employment, and marital status were associated with oral health in the pooled sample. Although education, income, employment, and marital status were associated with oral health in non-Hispanic Whites, none of these associations were found for Hispanic Whites. Conclusion. In a similar pattern to Blacks’ diminished return, differential gain of SES indicators exists between Hispanic and non-Hispanic Whites, with a disadvantage for Hispanic Whites. Diminished return of SES should be regarded as a systemically neglected contributing mechanism behind ethnic oral health disparities in the United States. Replication of Blacks’ diminished return for Hispanics suggests that these processes are not specific to ethnic minority groups, and non-White groups gain less because they are not enjoying the privilege and advantage of Whites. View Full-Text
Keywords: economic inequalities; ethnic health disparities; socioeconomic status; oral health economic inequalities; ethnic health disparities; socioeconomic status; oral health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Assari, S. Socioeconomic Status and Self-Rated Oral Health; Diminished Return among Hispanic Whites. Dent. J. 2018, 6, 11.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Dent. J. EISSN 2304-6767 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top