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Article

Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Using a Proteinaceous Binder Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials

1
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada
2
Thermochemical Processing Group, InnoTech Alberta, Vegreville, AB T9C 1T4, Canada
3
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1H9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Processes 2019, 7(4), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7040229
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Polymers: Processing and Chemical Modifications)
Pressing issues such as a growing energy demand and the need for energy diversification, emission reduction, and environmental protection serve as motivation for the utilization of biomass for production of sustainable fuels. However, use of biomass is currently limited due to its high moisture content, relatively low bulk and energy densities, and variability in shape and size, relative to fossil-based fuels such as coal. In recent years, a combination of thermochemical treatment (torrefaction) of biomass and subsequent pelletization has resulted in a renewable fuel that can potentially substitute for coal. However, production of torrefied wood pellets that satisfy fuel quality standards and other logistical requirements typically requires the use of an external binder. Here, we describe the development of a renewable binder from proteinaceous material recovered from specified risk materials (SRM), a negative-value byproduct from the rendering industry. Our binder was developed by co-reacting peptides recovered from hydrolyzed SRM with a polyamidoamine epichlorohydrin (PAE) resin, and then assessed through pelleting trials with a bench-scale continuous operating pelletizer. Torrefied wood pellets generated using peptides-PAE binder at 3% binder level satisfied ISO requirements for durability, higher heating value, and bulk density for TW2a type thermally-treated wood pellets. This proof-of-concept work demonstrates the potential of using an SRM-derived binder to improve the durability of torrefied wood pellets. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioenergy; torrefied wood; pelletization; wood pellets; specified risk materials; binder bioenergy; torrefied wood; pelletization; wood pellets; specified risk materials; binder
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adhikari, B.B.; Chae, M.; Zhu, C.; Khan, A.; Harfield, D.; Choi, P.; Bressler, D.C. Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Using a Proteinaceous Binder Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials. Processes 2019, 7, 229. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7040229

AMA Style

Adhikari BB, Chae M, Zhu C, Khan A, Harfield D, Choi P, Bressler DC. Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Using a Proteinaceous Binder Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials. Processes. 2019; 7(4):229. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7040229

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adhikari, Birendra B., Michael Chae, Chengyong Zhu, Ataullah Khan, Don Harfield, Phillip Choi, and David C. Bressler. 2019. "Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Using a Proteinaceous Binder Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials" Processes 7, no. 4: 229. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7040229

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