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Article

Comparison of Stigmatization of Suicidal People by Medical Professionals with Stigmatization by the General Population

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Sciences, Medical School Hamburg, 20457 Hamburg, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Edward Tolhurst, Pedram Sendi and Wilfred McSherry
Healthcare 2021, 9(7), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070896
Received: 12 June 2021 / Revised: 3 July 2021 / Accepted: 8 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
Stigmatization of suicide (SOS) affects help-seeking for suicidality and impedes successful treatment. This study aimed to identify different types of stigmatization and understand the causes and glorification of suicide by comparing three groups; within each of the following groups, the impact of age and gender was explored: (1) practicing medical professional in direct contact with suicidality (psychotherapists, psychiatrists, related medical professions (nurses, etc.)), (2) future medical professionals still in training, (3) and the general population with no professional contact with suicidality. German adults completed an online survey with a total of 742 participants. A MANCOVA was calculated with age and gender being controlled as covariates, due to different distribution. Practicing professionals showed significantly higher levels of SOS than the other groups, while the future professionals showed no differences in SOS from the general population. The understanding of suicide causes was similar across all groups. Men showed higher levels of SOS than women, while women scored higher at understanding of causes and glorification of suicide. Within the individual groups, female professionals in the age group “36–65 years” stigmatized suicide most, while showing the least glorification. The results suggest that tendencies towards SOS are promoted by practical experience with suicidality. Therefore, special training is recommended to reduce SOS. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicide; suicidality; stigmatization; healthcare professionals suicide; suicidality; stigmatization; healthcare professionals
MDPI and ACS Style

Eilers, J.J.; Kasten, E.; Schnell, T. Comparison of Stigmatization of Suicidal People by Medical Professionals with Stigmatization by the General Population. Healthcare 2021, 9, 896. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070896

AMA Style

Eilers JJ, Kasten E, Schnell T. Comparison of Stigmatization of Suicidal People by Medical Professionals with Stigmatization by the General Population. Healthcare. 2021; 9(7):896. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070896

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eilers, Jill Julia, Erich Kasten, and Thomas Schnell. 2021. "Comparison of Stigmatization of Suicidal People by Medical Professionals with Stigmatization by the General Population" Healthcare 9, no. 7: 896. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070896

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