Special Issue "Patient Safety, Human Factors, and Simulation and Their Impact upon the Delivery and Quality of Healthcare"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Wilfred McSherry
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Social Care, Staffordshire University, Stafford, UK
2. The University Hospitals of North Midland NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK
3. VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway
Interests: spirituality; spiritual care; dignity and respect; culture and values; person-centred care and holistic care; nursing; patient experience; quality and safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Edward Tolhurst
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Midwifery and Allied Health Professions, Schoool of Health and Social Care, Staffordshire University, Stafford UK
Interests: dementia; ageing; care; human factors in healthcare; leadership and management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scope of this special edition is aligned with the key themes of patient safety, human factors, and simulation in healthcare. The emphasis is upon how principles, concepts and practices associated with these themes can enhance the systems, environments and organisational cultures that shape patient experience. This spans from micro-level instances of interaction between professionals and patients, to macro-level structural and cultural contexts.

Specific matters for consideration could include: clinical governance; professional responsibility and accountability; regulation and scrutiny; measuring impact and outcomes; learning from incidents; audit and inspection; technology and equipment; and knowledge management.

The purpose of this special edition of Healthcare is thus to collate a body of international papers on patient safety, human factors, and simulation, which will ultimately inform the improvement of healthcare contexts and practice.

We welcome article submissions from across the full-breadth of healthcare-related disciplines including medicine, nursing, allied health professions, psychology, economics, and sociology. We will also be very pleased to receive submissions that have a multidisciplinary basis, covering dimensions such as safety science, operations research, improvement science and simulation pedagogy.

Prof. Dr. Wilfred McSherry
Dr. Edward Tolhurst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Patient experience
  • Patient Safety
  • Human Factors
  • Simulation
  • Healthcare
  • Quality
  • Compassion and Care

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Trust in Intensive Care Patients, Family, and Healthcare Professionals: The Development of a Conceptual Framework Followed by a Case Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020208 - 15 Feb 2021
Abstract
Intensive care patients experience anxiety, pain, uncertainty, and total dependency. In general, it is important to develop trust between the healthcare professionals (HCPs), patients, and their family. Trust building in the ICU setting is challenging because of the time sensitivity of decision making [...] Read more.
Intensive care patients experience anxiety, pain, uncertainty, and total dependency. In general, it is important to develop trust between the healthcare professionals (HCPs), patients, and their family. Trust building in the ICU setting is challenging because of the time sensitivity of decision making and the dependency of patients on health care professionals. The objectives of this study are the development of a trust framework and then to use this framework in a case study in the intensive care. In three steps we developed a comprehensive trust framework from the literature concerning trust. First, we identified the elements of trust. Second, we adapted and integrated the dimensions to six concepts to construct the trust framework. Third, these concepts are incorporated into a comprehensive trust framework. In a case study we explored the facilitators and barriers within this framework in eight semi-open interviews with healthcare professionals and eight patients or partners. Trust was first explored inductively and then deductively. We showed that HCPs, patients, and family have largely the same perspective regarding the facilitators of trust, in which communication emerged as the most important one. Other facilitators are maintaining an open feedback culture for HCPs and being aware of patients’ physical and informational privacy. Patients want to be approached as an individual with individual needs. Dishonesty and differences in values and norms were the most important barriers. To contribute to a positive perception of health delivery and to avoid conflicts between HCP and patients or their family we formulated five practical recommendations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Relational Quality of Registered Nurses and Nursing Assistants: Influence on Patient Safety Culture
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020189 - 09 Feb 2021
Abstract
Registered nurses (RNs) working within acute care hospitals have an incredible responsibility to provide safe care in a complex environment which requires trust, teamwork, and communication. Nursing assistants (NAs) play a critical role in working with RNs to meet these growing demands of [...] Read more.
Registered nurses (RNs) working within acute care hospitals have an incredible responsibility to provide safe care in a complex environment which requires trust, teamwork, and communication. Nursing assistants (NAs) play a critical role in working with RNs to meet these growing demands of inpatient care. Minimal evidence exists exploring the relational quality between RNs and NAs within hospitals. The aim of this study is to explore RN and NA behaviors and experiences that promote patient safety and teamwork and enhance communication between RNs and NAs within the hospital environment. Qualitative analysis was used, with two focus groups which included six participants within each group (three RNs and three NAs) from two separate inpatient units. Transcripts were reviewed and coded for themes. Collaborative teamwork and two-way communication were commonly reported as behaviors that promote patient safety. Trust between RNs and NAs was identified as a key component of positive relationships between RNs and NAs. Participants identified four common behaviors that build trust, which were accountability, effective conflict resolution, collaborative teamwork, and prioritizing patient needs. Finally, teamwork was identified as a common strategy to increase communication effectiveness between RNs and NAs. High relational quality (RQ) between the RN and NA is an important component of teamwork and patient safety culture. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Differences in and Prognostic Value of Quality of Life Data in Rectal Cancer Patients with and without Distant Metastases
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010001 - 22 Dec 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Individualization of treatment is a major challenge in oncology and requires a variety of predictive and prognostic parameters. In addition to tumor biology analyses, baseline health-related quality of life might be a valid tool to predict overall survival. This study was [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Individualization of treatment is a major challenge in oncology and requires a variety of predictive and prognostic parameters. In addition to tumor biology analyses, baseline health-related quality of life might be a valid tool to predict overall survival. This study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic relevance of baseline quality of life data in patients with rectal cancer. In this context, differences between patients with and without distant metastases were of particular interest. (2) Methods: Our cohort included 258 patients with rectal cancer treated in the radiotherapy department of the University Hospital Erlangen. Patients completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quality of life questionnaire (QLQ C30) and colorectal cancer questionnaire (CR38). Clinical and survival data were provided by the Gießener Tumor Documentation System (GTDS) of the Comprehensive Cancer Center Erlangen-EMN (CCC, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany). Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier analyses and univariate and multivariate Cox regression. (3) Results: A cohort of 258 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma was analyzed including 50 patients (19.4%) with metastatic disease. No differences were observed between patients with and without distant metastases in most areas of quality of life studied, with the exception of physical function, loss of appetite, chemotherapy side effects and weight loss. Gender, baseline physical function, sexual function, diarrhea, and weight loss over time had a prognostic value in the entire cohort. Appetite loss was an additional prognostic parameter in patients with distant metastases. (4) Conclusions: The quality of life of patients with metastatic disease differed only slightly from non-metastatic patients. Health-related quality of life data provide prognostic information for patients with rectal cancer. Full article
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