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Open AccessArticle

Factors Influencing Pregnant Women’s Injuries and Fetal Loss Due to Motor Vehicle Collisions: A National Crash Data-Based Study

1
Department of Legal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Tsukinowa, Seta, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192, Japan
2
Center for Integrated Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
3
Joyson Safety Systems Japan K.K. Echigawa Plant, 658 Echigawa, Aisho-cho, Echi-gun, Shiga 529-1388, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mariano Cingolani
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030273
Received: 31 January 2021 / Revised: 19 February 2021 / Accepted: 24 February 2021 / Published: 3 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Injuries and Prevention)
To examine the factors that influence substantial injuries for pregnant women and negative fetal outcomes in motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), a retrospective analysis using the National Automotive Sampling System/Crashworthiness Data System was performed in Shiga University of Medical Science. We analyzed data from 736 pregnant women who, between 2001 and 2015, had injuries that were an abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score of one or more. The mean age was 25.9 ± 6.4 years and the mean gestational age was 26.2 ± 8.2 weeks. Additionally, 568 pregnant women had mild injuries and 168 had moderate to severe injuries. Logistic regression analysis revealed that seatbelt use (odds ratio (OR), 0.30), airbag deployment (OR, 2.00), and changes in velocity (21–40 km/h: OR, 3.03; 41–60 km/h: OR, 13.47; ≥61 km/h: OR, 44.56) were identified as independent predictors of having a moderate to severe injury. The positive and negative outcome groups included 231 and 12 pregnant women, respectively. Injury severity in pregnant women was identified as an independent predictor of a negative outcome (OR, 2.79). Avoiding moderate to severe maternal injuries is a high priority for saving the fetus, and education on appropriate seatbelt use and limiting vehicle speed for pregnant women is required. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnant women; motor vehicle collision; passenger; injury severity; fetus fatality pregnant women; motor vehicle collision; passenger; injury severity; fetus fatality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hattori, S.; Hitosugi, M.; Moriguchi, S.; Baba, M.; Takaso, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimura, S.; Miyata, Y. Factors Influencing Pregnant Women’s Injuries and Fetal Loss Due to Motor Vehicle Collisions: A National Crash Data-Based Study. Healthcare 2021, 9, 273. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030273

AMA Style

Hattori S, Hitosugi M, Moriguchi S, Baba M, Takaso M, Nakamura M, Tsujimura S, Miyata Y. Factors Influencing Pregnant Women’s Injuries and Fetal Loss Due to Motor Vehicle Collisions: A National Crash Data-Based Study. Healthcare. 2021; 9(3):273. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030273

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hattori, Shinobu; Hitosugi, Masahito; Moriguchi, Shingo; Baba, Mineko; Takaso, Marin; Nakamura, Mami; Tsujimura, Seiji; Miyata, Yasuhito. 2021. "Factors Influencing Pregnant Women’s Injuries and Fetal Loss Due to Motor Vehicle Collisions: A National Crash Data-Based Study" Healthcare 9, no. 3: 273. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030273

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