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Moderating Effect of Residential History on the Effects of a Fatherhood Program on Parenting Skills Satisfaction among Nonresident African American Fathers

1
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture, and Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, 2858 SPH1, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA
2
Flint Odyssey House, Flint, MI 48502, USA
3
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2018, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6010013
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 25 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
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Abstract

Nonresident African American (AA) fathers sometimes face challenges to achieving satisfaction with their parenting skills, which may inhibit their motivations for parenting. Studies have found that residential history of fathers is associated with parental involvement; however, current fatherhood programs rarely consider the influence of different residential history on fathering. In the current study, we examined whether nonresident AA fathers’ residential history with their sons moderated their parenting skills satisfaction after participating in the Fathers and Sons Program. Our results indicated that after controlling for fathers’ pretest parenting skills satisfaction, age, education, marital status, employment, and ever lived with their son’s mother; there was a moderating effect of residential history on the intervention’s effects on posttest parenting skills satisfaction. The regression analyses showed that fathers in the intervention group who had lived with their son increased their parenting skills satisfaction more at posttest compared with fathers who had never lived with their sons. However, fathers in the comparison group who had lived with their sons had lower posttest parenting skills satisfaction. Future fatherhood programs for nonresident AA fathers should develop more nuanced group-specific interventions that consider residential history as a critical factor to enhance their parenting skills satisfaction as a strategy for improving father involvement. View Full-Text
Keywords: nonresident African American fathers; parenting skills satisfaction; residential history; the Fathers and Sons Program nonresident African American fathers; parenting skills satisfaction; residential history; the Fathers and Sons Program
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Qian, Y.; De Loney, E.H.; Caldwell, C.H. Moderating Effect of Residential History on the Effects of a Fatherhood Program on Parenting Skills Satisfaction among Nonresident African American Fathers. Healthcare 2018, 6, 13.

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