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Open AccessArticle

Response to Anthracnose in a Tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis) Collection Is Influenced by Anthocyanin Pigmentation

1
DRAT, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
2
Agricultural Faculty, Agricultural Engineering Course, Instituto Superior Politécnico de Gaza, Lionde, 1204 Chókwè, Mozambique
3
LEAF, Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(5), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050583
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 16 April 2020 / Accepted: 24 April 2020 / Published: 2 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Colletotrichum Species and Plants)
Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lupini, is a major limiting factor for lupin production. Tarwi or Andean Lupin (Lupinus mutabilis) is generally regarded as susceptible to anthracnose, but the high protein and oil content of its seeds raise interest in promoting its cultivation in Europe. In this study we evaluated the response to anthracnose of 10 tarwi accessions contrasting in anthocyanin pigmentation, by comparison to white lupin (Lupinus albus), using a contemporary Portuguese fungal isolate. A severity rating scale was optimized, including weighted parameters considering the type of symptoms and organs affected. All tarwi accessions were classified as susceptible, exhibiting sporulating necroses on the main stem from seven days after inoculation. Anthracnose severity was lower on anthocyanin-rich tarwi plants, with accession LM34 standing out as the less susceptible. Accession I82 better combines anthracnose response and yield. In global terms, disease severity was lower on white lupin than on tarwi. Although based on a limited collection, the results of the study show the existence of genetic variability among L. mutabilis towards anthracnose response relatable with anthocyanin pigmentation, providing insights for more detailed and thorough characterization of tarwi resistance to anthracnose. View Full-Text
Keywords: Lupinus mutabilis; Lupinus albus; Colletotrichum lupini; anthracnose; susceptibility; anthocyanin pigmentation Lupinus mutabilis; Lupinus albus; Colletotrichum lupini; anthracnose; susceptibility; anthocyanin pigmentation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Guilengue, N.; Neves-Martins, J.; Talhinhas, P. Response to Anthracnose in a Tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis) Collection Is Influenced by Anthocyanin Pigmentation. Plants 2020, 9, 583.

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