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Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Other Limiting Factors in the Growth of C3 and C4 Plants

1
Department for Management of Science and Technology Development, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam
2
Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam
3
School of Health and Life Sciences, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Victoria 3350, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(4), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8040092
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
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Abstract

It has been widely observed that recent increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations have had, so far, a positive effect on the growth of plants. This is not surprising since CO2 is an important nutrient for plant matter, being directly involved in photosynthesis. However, it is also known that the conditions which have accompanied this increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration have also had significant effects on other environmental factors. It is possible that these other effects may emerge as limiting factors which could act to prevent plant growth. This may involve complex interactions between prevailing sunlight and water conditions, variable temperatures, the availability of essential nutrients and the type of synthetic pathway for the plant species. The issue of concern to this investigation is if we should be worried about a possible shift in the C3-C4 paradigm driven by changes in the atmospheric CO2 concentration, or if some other factor, such as water scarcity, is much more relevant within a 30-year time frame. If an opinion is needed on what will have the worst effect on the survival of the planet between the scarcity of water or the reduced efficiency of C3 plants to sequester CO2, the issue of water is the more incisive. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 enrichment; photosynthesis; carbon cycle; C3 species; C4 species CO2 enrichment; photosynthesis; carbon cycle; C3 species; C4 species
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Boretti, A.; Florentine, S. Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Other Limiting Factors in the Growth of C3 and C4 Plants. Plants 2019, 8, 92.

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