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Article

Different Growth and Sporulation Responses to Temperature Gradient among Obligate Apomictic Strains of Ulva prolifera

1
Bio-Resources Business Development Division, Riken Food Co., Ltd., Miyagi 985-0844, Japan
2
Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
3
Usa Marine Biological Institute, Kochi University, Kochi 781-1164, Japan
4
Department of Algal Development and Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max-Planck-Ring 5, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Koji Mikami
Plants 2021, 10(11), 2256; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10112256
Received: 29 September 2021 / Revised: 19 October 2021 / Accepted: 19 October 2021 / Published: 22 October 2021
The green macroalga Ulva prolifera has a number of variants, some of which are asexual (independent from sexual variants). Although it has been harvested for food, the yield is decreasing. To meet market demand, developing elite cultivars is required. The present study investigated the genetic stability of asexual variants, genotype (hsp90 gene sequences) and phenotype variations across a temperature gradient (10–30 °C) in an apomictic population. Asexual variants were collected from six localities in Japan and were isolated as an unialgal strain. The hsp90 gene sequences of six strains were different and each strain included multiple distinct alleles, suggesting that the strains were diploid and heterozygous. The responses of growth and sporulation versus temperature differed among strains. Differences in thermosensitivity among strains could be interpreted as the result of evolution and processes of adaptation to site-specific environmental conditions. Although carbon content did not differ among strains and cultivation temperatures, nitrogen content tended to increase at higher temperatures and there were differences among strains. A wide variety of asexual variants stably reproducing clonally would be advantageous in selecting elite cultivars for long-term cultivation. Using asexual variants as available resources for elite cultivars provides potential support for increasing the productivity of U. prolifera. View Full-Text
Keywords: macroalga; Ulva prolifera; obligate asexual strain; relative growth rate; sporulation; land-based cultivation; germling cluster method macroalga; Ulva prolifera; obligate asexual strain; relative growth rate; sporulation; land-based cultivation; germling cluster method
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sato, Y.; Kinoshita, Y.; Mogamiya, M.; Inomata, E.; Hoshino, M.; Hiraoka, M. Different Growth and Sporulation Responses to Temperature Gradient among Obligate Apomictic Strains of Ulva prolifera. Plants 2021, 10, 2256. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10112256

AMA Style

Sato Y, Kinoshita Y, Mogamiya M, Inomata E, Hoshino M, Hiraoka M. Different Growth and Sporulation Responses to Temperature Gradient among Obligate Apomictic Strains of Ulva prolifera. Plants. 2021; 10(11):2256. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10112256

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sato, Yoichi, Yutaro Kinoshita, Miho Mogamiya, Eri Inomata, Masakazu Hoshino, and Masanori Hiraoka. 2021. "Different Growth and Sporulation Responses to Temperature Gradient among Obligate Apomictic Strains of Ulva prolifera" Plants 10, no. 11: 2256. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10112256

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