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Dye Adsorption and Electrical Property of Oxide-Loaded Carbon Fiber Made by Electrospinning and Hydrothermal Treatment

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Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 W Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768, USA
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Department of Natural, Physical and Health Sciences, Cypress College, 9200 Valley View, Cypress, CA 90630, USA
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Department of Public Health, The University of California, Irvine, 501 Aldrich Hall, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
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Department of Natural, Physical and Health Sciences, Citrus College, 1000 W Foothill Blvd, Glendora, CA 91741, USA
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Department of Natural, Physical and Health Sciences, California State University Fullerton, 800 N State College Blvd, Fullerton, CA 92831, USA
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Diamond Bar High School, 21400 Pathfinder Road, Diamond Bar, CA 91765, USA
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Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fibers 2019, 7(8), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7080074
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 26 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 18 August 2019
Our current study deals with the dye adsorption and electrical property of a partially carbonized composite fiber containing transition metal oxides including, iron oxide, nickel oxide, and titanium oxide. The fiber was made by electrospinning, carbonization, and hydrothermal treatment. During the electrospinning, titanium oxide particles were dispersed in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution. Nickel chloride and iron nitrate were added into the solution to generate nickel oxide and iron oxide in the subsequent heat treatment processes. The polymer fiber was oxidized first at an elevated temperature of 250 °C to stabilize the structure of PAN. Then, we performed higher temperature heat treatment at 500 °C in a furnace with hydrogen gas protection to partially carbonize the polymer fiber. After that, the oxide-containing fiber was coated with activated carbon in a diluted sugar solution via hydrothermal carbonization at 200 °C for 8 h. The pressure reached 1.45 MPa in the reaction chamber. The obtained product was tested in view of the dye, Rhodamine B, adsorption using a Vis-UV spectrometer. Electrical property characterization was performed using an electrochemical work station. It was found that the hydrothermally treated oxide-containing fiber demonstrated obvious dye adsorption behavior. The visible light absorption intensity of the Rhodamine B dye decreased with the increase in the soaking time of the fiber in the dye solution. The impedance of the fiber was increased due to the hydrothermal carbonization treatment. We also found that charge build-up was faster at the surface of the specimen without the hydrothermally treated carbon layer. Electricity generation under visible light excitation is more intensive at the hydrothermally treated fiber than at the one without the hydrothermal treatment. This result is consistent with that obtained from the dye adsorption/decomposition test because the charge generation is more efficient at the surface of the hydrothermally treated fiber, which allows the dye to be decomposed faster by the treated fibers with activated carbon. View Full-Text
Keywords: electrospinning; hydrothermal carbonization; transition metal oxide; polymeric carbon fiber; activated carbon; dye adsorption; impedance measurement; photovoltaic; charge generation electrospinning; hydrothermal carbonization; transition metal oxide; polymeric carbon fiber; activated carbon; dye adsorption; impedance measurement; photovoltaic; charge generation
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Kansara, S.; Patel, S.; Gan, Y.X.; Jaimes, G.; Gan, J.B. Dye Adsorption and Electrical Property of Oxide-Loaded Carbon Fiber Made by Electrospinning and Hydrothermal Treatment. Fibers 2019, 7, 74.

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