Next Article in Journal
Quality of Community Pharmacy Practice in Antibiotic Self-Medication Encounters: A Simulated Patient Study in Upper Egypt
Next Article in Special Issue
Rifampicin-Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Intracellular Infections
Previous Article in Journal
Characterizing Antimicrobial Use in the Livestock Sector in Three South East Asian Countries (Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Chemical Profile, Antibacterial Activity and Antibiotic-Modulating Effect of the Hexanic Zea Mays L. Silk Extract (Poaceae)
Open AccessArticle

Antifungal Activity in Compounds from the Australian Desert Plant Eremophila alternifolia with Potency Against Cryptococcus spp.

1
Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia
2
National Mycology Reference Centre, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia
3
School of Engineering, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia
4
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2019, 8(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8020034
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 29 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 31 March 2019
Plant metabolites that have shown activity against bacteria and/or environmental fungi represent valuable leads for the identification and development of novel drugs against clinically important human pathogenic fungi. Plants from the genus Eremophila were highly valued in traditional Australian Aboriginal medicinal practices, and E. alternifolia was the most prized among them. As antibacterial activity of extracts from E. alternifolia has been documented, this study addresses the question whether there is also activity against infectious fungal human pathogens. Compounds from leaf-extracts were purified and identified by 1- and 2-D NMR. These were then tested by disk diffusion and broth microdilution assays against ten clinically and environmentally relevant yeast and mould species. The most potent activity was observed with the diterpene compound, 8,19-dihydroxyserrulat-14-ene against Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans, with minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) comparable to those of Amphotericin B. This compound also exhibited activity against six Candida species. Combined with previous studies showing an antibacterial effect, this finding could explain a broad antimicrobial effect from Eremophila extracts in their traditional medicinal usage. The discovery of potent antifungal compounds from Eremophila extracts is a promising development in the search for desperately needed antifungal compounds particularly for Cryptococcus infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: Diterpenoids; antifungal; wound healing; serrulatane; fungi; Eremophila; Cryptococcus; disk diffusion; broth microdilution Diterpenoids; antifungal; wound healing; serrulatane; fungi; Eremophila; Cryptococcus; disk diffusion; broth microdilution
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hossain, M.A.; Biva, I.J.; Kidd, S.E.; Whittle, J.D.; Griesser, H.J.; Coad, B.R. Antifungal Activity in Compounds from the Australian Desert Plant Eremophila alternifolia with Potency Against Cryptococcus spp.. Antibiotics 2019, 8, 34. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8020034

AMA Style

Hossain MA, Biva IJ, Kidd SE, Whittle JD, Griesser HJ, Coad BR. Antifungal Activity in Compounds from the Australian Desert Plant Eremophila alternifolia with Potency Against Cryptococcus spp.. Antibiotics. 2019; 8(2):34. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8020034

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hossain, Mohammed A.; Biva, Israt J.; Kidd, Sarah E.; Whittle, Jason D.; Griesser, Hans J.; Coad, Bryan R. 2019. "Antifungal Activity in Compounds from the Australian Desert Plant Eremophila alternifolia with Potency Against Cryptococcus spp." Antibiotics 8, no. 2: 34. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8020034

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop