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Article

Quantitative Changes in Muscular and Capillary Oxygen Desaturation Measured by Optical Sensors during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Titration for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

1
Center for Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research and Epileptology, Clinic Barmelweid AG, 5017 Barmelweid, Switzerland
2
Barmelweid Academy, Clinic Barmelweid AG, 5017 Barmelweid, Switzerland
3
Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biosensors 2022, 12(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12010003
Received: 28 October 2021 / Revised: 24 November 2021 / Accepted: 19 December 2021 / Published: 21 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Wearable Biosensors for Human Health Monitoring)
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective treatment. Poor adherence is one of the major challenges in CPAP therapy. The recent boom of wearable optical sensors measuring oxygen saturation makes at-home multiple-night CPAP titrations possible, which may essentially improve the adherence of CPAP therapy by optimizing its pressure in a real-life setting economically. We tested whether the oxygen desaturations (ODs) measured in the arm muscle (arm_OD) by gold-standard frequency-domain multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (FDMD-NIRS) change quantitatively with titrated CPAP pressures in OSA patients together with polysomnography. We found that the arm_OD (2.08 ± 1.23%, mean ± standard deviation) was significantly smaller (p-value < 0.0001) than the fingertip OD (finger_OD) (4.46 ± 2.37%) measured by a polysomnography pulse oximeter. Linear mixed-effects models suggested that CPAP pressure was a significant predictor for finger_OD but not for arm_OD. Since FDMD-NIRS measures a mixture of arterial and venous OD, whereas a fingertip pulse oximeter measures arterial OD, our results of no association between arm_OD and finger_OD indicate that the arm_OD mainly represented venous desaturation. Arm_OD measured by optical sensors used for wearables may not be a suitable indicator of the CPAP titration effectiveness. View Full-Text
Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea; continuous positive airway pressure therapy; near-infrared spectroscopy; oxygen desaturation; arm; pulse oximeter; wearable obstructive sleep apnea; continuous positive airway pressure therapy; near-infrared spectroscopy; oxygen desaturation; arm; pulse oximeter; wearable
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, Z.; Qi, M.; Hügli, G.; Khatami, R. Quantitative Changes in Muscular and Capillary Oxygen Desaturation Measured by Optical Sensors during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Titration for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Biosensors 2022, 12, 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12010003

AMA Style

Zhang Z, Qi M, Hügli G, Khatami R. Quantitative Changes in Muscular and Capillary Oxygen Desaturation Measured by Optical Sensors during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Titration for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Biosensors. 2022; 12(1):3. https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12010003

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Zhongxing, Ming Qi, Gordana Hügli, and Ramin Khatami. 2022. "Quantitative Changes in Muscular and Capillary Oxygen Desaturation Measured by Optical Sensors during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Titration for Obstructive Sleep Apnea" Biosensors 12, no. 1: 3. https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12010003

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