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Correction published on 15 January 2018, see Nanomaterials 2018, 8(1), 45.

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7100305

Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials

1
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2
College of Education, University of Garmian, Kalar 46021, Iraq
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 1 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Liquid Crystals)
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Abstract

Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i) addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii) novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii) the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide. View Full-Text
Keywords: liquid crystal; lyotropic; inorganic nanoparticle; clay; tobacco mosaic virus (TMV); Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA); cellulose nanocrystal; nanotube; nanowire; nanorod; graphene; graphene oxide liquid crystal; lyotropic; inorganic nanoparticle; clay; tobacco mosaic virus (TMV); Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA); cellulose nanocrystal; nanotube; nanowire; nanorod; graphene; graphene oxide
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Dierking, I.; Al-Zangana, S. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials. Nanomaterials 2017, 7, 305.

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