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[email protected] [email protected] Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Building Block Sorption

1
NMR and Structure Analysis Research Group, Department of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Sol-Gel Centre for Research on Inorganic Powders and Thin Films Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S3, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
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Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Eötvös Loránd Research Network (IMEC RCNS ELKH), Magyar Tudósok Körútja 2, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
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Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen, Egyetem tér 1, H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary
5
Molecular Recognition and Interaction Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences-Eötvös Loránd Research Network at University of Debrecen, Egyetem tér 1, H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yuanbing Mao
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(9), 2166; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11092166
Received: 1 July 2021 / Revised: 2 August 2021 / Accepted: 13 August 2021 / Published: 25 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Oxide Nanomaterials: From Fundamental to Applications)
The development of delivery systems for the immobilization of nucleic acid cargo molecules is of prime importance due to the need for safe administration of DNA or RNA type of antigens and adjuvants in vaccines. Nanoparticles (NP) in the size range of 20–200 nm have attractive properties as vaccine carriers because they achieve passive targeting of immune cells and can enhance the immune response of a weakly immunogenic antigen via their size. We prepared high capacity 50 nm diameter [email protected] NPs with monoclinic/cubic zirconia shell by a green, cheap and up-scalable sol–gel method. We studied the behavior of the particles upon water dialysis and found that the ageing of the zirconia shell is a major determinant of the colloidal stability after transfer into the water due to physisorption of the zirconia starting material on the surface. We determined the optimum conditions for adsorption of DNA building blocks, deoxynucleoside monophosphates (dNMP), the colloidal stability of the resulting NPs and its time dependence. The ligand adsorption was favored by acidic pH, while colloidal stability required neutral-alkaline pH; thus, the optimal pH for the preparation of nucleic acid-modified particles is between 7.0–7.5. The developed [email protected] NPs bind as high as 207 mg dNMPs on 1 g of nanocarrier at neutral-physiological pH while maintaining good colloidal stability. We studied the influence of biological buffers and found that while phosphate buffers decrease the loading dramatically, other commonly used buffers, such as HEPES, are compatible with the nanoplatform. We propose the prepared [email protected] NPs as promising carriers for nucleic acid-type drug cargos. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanocarrier; nanoparticle; age-dependent adsorption; Langmuir isotherm; deoxynucleoside monophosphate; [email protected]; [email protected]; solution NMR; buffer interference with adsorption nanocarrier; nanoparticle; age-dependent adsorption; Langmuir isotherm; deoxynucleoside monophosphate; [email protected]; [email protected]; solution NMR; buffer interference with adsorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Naszályi Nagy, L.; Dhaene, E.; Van Zele, M.; Mihály, J.; Klébert, S.; Varga, Z.; Kövér, K.E.; De Buysser, K.; Van Driessche, I.; Martins, J.C.; Fehér, K. [email protected] [email protected] Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Building Block Sorption. Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 2166. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11092166

AMA Style

Naszályi Nagy L, Dhaene E, Van Zele M, Mihály J, Klébert S, Varga Z, Kövér KE, De Buysser K, Van Driessche I, Martins JC, Fehér K. [email protected] [email protected] Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Building Block Sorption. Nanomaterials. 2021; 11(9):2166. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11092166

Chicago/Turabian Style

Naszályi Nagy, Livia, Evert Dhaene, Matthias Van Zele, Judith Mihály, Szilvia Klébert, Zoltán Varga, Katalin E. Kövér, Klaartje De Buysser, Isabel Van Driessche, José C. Martins, and Krisztina Fehér. 2021. "[email protected] [email protected] Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Building Block Sorption" Nanomaterials 11, no. 9: 2166. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11092166

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