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Open AccessArticle

Transcriptome Profiling and Toxicity Following Long-Term, Low Dose Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Ni and NiO Nanoparticles—Comparison with NiCl2

1
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, 81379 Munich, Germany
3
Department of Oncology and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratories, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 649; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040649
Received: 14 February 2020 / Accepted: 11 March 2020 / Published: 31 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lung Cell Toxicity of Metal-containing Nanoparticles)
Production of nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles (NPs) leads to a risk of exposure and subsequent health effects. Understanding the toxicological effects and underlying mechanisms using relevant in vitro methods is, therefore, needed. The aim of this study is to explore changes in gene expression using RNA sequencing following long term (six weeks) low dose (0.5 µg Ni/mL) exposure of human lung cells (BEAS-2B) to Ni and NiO NPs as well as soluble NiCl2. Genotoxicity and cell transformation as well as cellular dose of Ni are also analyzed. Exposure to NiCl2 resulted in the largest number of differentially expressed genes (197), despite limited uptake, suggesting a major role of extracellular receptors and downstream signaling. Gene expression changes for all Ni exposures included genes coding for calcium-binding proteins (S100A14 and S100A2) as well as TIMP3, CCND2, EPCAM, IL4R and DDIT4. Several top enriched pathways for NiCl2 were defined by upregulation of, e.g., interleukin-1A and -1B, as well as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA). All Ni exposures caused DNA strand breaks (comet assay), whereas no induction of micronuclei was observed. Taken together, this study provides an insight into Ni-induced toxicity and mechanisms occurring at lower and more realistic exposure levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: nickel nanoparticles; genotoxicity; long-term exposure; RNA sequencing nickel nanoparticles; genotoxicity; long-term exposure; RNA sequencing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gliga, A.R.; Di Bucchianico, S.; Åkerlund, E.; Karlsson, H.L. Transcriptome Profiling and Toxicity Following Long-Term, Low Dose Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Ni and NiO Nanoparticles—Comparison with NiCl2. Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040649

AMA Style

Gliga AR, Di Bucchianico S, Åkerlund E, Karlsson HL. Transcriptome Profiling and Toxicity Following Long-Term, Low Dose Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Ni and NiO Nanoparticles—Comparison with NiCl2. Nanomaterials. 2020; 10(4):649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040649

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gliga, Anda R.; Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Åkerlund, Emma; Karlsson, Hanna L. 2020. "Transcriptome Profiling and Toxicity Following Long-Term, Low Dose Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Ni and NiO Nanoparticles—Comparison with NiCl2" Nanomaterials 10, no. 4: 649. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040649

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