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Article

Biomass and Biogas Yield of Maize (Zea mays L.) Grown under Artificial Shading

1
Institute of Crop Science (340), University of Hohenheim, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
2
Centre for Agricultural Technology Augustenberg (LTZ), 76287 Rheinstetten-Forchheim, Germany
3
Regional Council Freiburg, 79083 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2018, 8(11), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8110178
Received: 25 August 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy and Agriculture)
Agroforestry, as an improved cropping system, offers some advantages in terms of yield, biodiversity, erosion protection or habitats for beneficial insects. It can fulfill the actual sustainability requirements for bioenergy production like food supply, nature conservation, stop of deforestation. However, competition between intercropped species for water, nutrients and light availability has to be carefully considered. A field trial with shading nets was conducted in Southwest Germany to evaluate the influence of different shading levels (−12, −26, and −50% of full sunlight) on biomass growth, dry matter yield and biogas quality parameters of maize (Zea mays L., cv. ‘Corioli CS’). Shading the plants causes a delayed development, a reduction in height and leaf area index and a slower senescence. Dry matter yields were reduced about 18%, 19%, and 44% compared to 21.05 Mg ha−1 year−1 at full sunlight. Biogas and methane yields were also significantly reduced, the 50% shading treatment showed a reduction of 45% for both parameters. Further, shading led to higher crude protein and crude ash contents. If silage maize is grown under shade, the yields of dry matter, biogas, and methane are nearly halved under 50% shade. Cultivation up to 26% shading could be possible. View Full-Text
Keywords: maize (Zea mays L.); agroforestry; biogas; shade; yield; growth; quality maize (Zea mays L.); agroforestry; biogas; shade; yield; growth; quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schulz, V.S.; Munz, S.; Stolzenburg, K.; Hartung, J.; Weisenburger, S.; Mastel, K.; Möller, K.; Claupein, W.; Graeff-Hönninger, S. Biomass and Biogas Yield of Maize (Zea mays L.) Grown under Artificial Shading. Agriculture 2018, 8, 178. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8110178

AMA Style

Schulz VS, Munz S, Stolzenburg K, Hartung J, Weisenburger S, Mastel K, Möller K, Claupein W, Graeff-Hönninger S. Biomass and Biogas Yield of Maize (Zea mays L.) Grown under Artificial Shading. Agriculture. 2018; 8(11):178. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8110178

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schulz, Vanessa S., Sebastian Munz, Kerstin Stolzenburg, Jens Hartung, Sebastian Weisenburger, Klaus Mastel, Kurt Möller, Wilhelm Claupein, and Simone Graeff-Hönninger. 2018. "Biomass and Biogas Yield of Maize (Zea mays L.) Grown under Artificial Shading" Agriculture 8, no. 11: 178. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8110178

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