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Open AccessArticle

We are What We Eat: Impact of Food from Short Supply Chain on Metabolic Syndrome

1
Dept. of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, and Dept. of Molecular Pharmacology, Montefiore University Hospital, Fleischer Institute for Diabetes and Metabolism (FIDAM), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM), New York, NY 10461, USA
2
Dept. of Advanced Biomedical Science, Federico II University, 80131 Naples, Italy
3
International Translational Research and Medical Education Consortium (ITME), 80131 Naples, Italy
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Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, University of Salerno, 8408 Baronissi, Italy
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“San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona” University Hospital, 84131 Salerno, Italy
6
Health’s Innovation, Campania Regional Government, 80132 Naples, Italy
7
Dept. of Public Health, Federico II University, 80131 Naples, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(12), 2061; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8122061
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 15 November 2019 / Accepted: 19 November 2019 / Published: 23 November 2019
Food supply in the Mediterranean area has been recently modified by big retail distribution; for instance, industrial retail has favored shipments of groceries from regions that are intensive producers of mass food, generating a long supply chain (LSC) of food that opposes short supply chains (SSCs) that promote local food markets. However, the actual functional role of food retail and distribution in the determination of the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been studied hitherto. The main aim of this study was to test the effects of food chain length on the prevalence of MetS in a population accustomed to the Mediterranean diet. We conducted an observational study in Southern Italy on individuals adhering to the Mediterranean diet. We examined a total of 407 subjects (41% females) with an average age of 56 ± 14.5 years (as standard deviation) and found that being on the Mediterranean diet with a SSC significantly reduces the prevalence of MetS compared with the LSC (SSC: 19.65%, LSC: 31.46%; p: 0.007). Our data indicate for the first time that the length of food supply chain plays a key role in determining the risk of MetS in a population adhering to the Mediterranean diet. View Full-Text
Keywords: mediterranean diet; supply chain of food; metabolic syndrome; food retail; cardiovascular risk mediterranean diet; supply chain of food; metabolic syndrome; food retail; cardiovascular risk
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Santulli, G.; Pascale, V.; Finelli, R.; Visco, V.; Giannotti, R.; Massari, A.; Morisco, C.; Ciccarelli, M.; Illario, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Coscioni, E. We are What We Eat: Impact of Food from Short Supply Chain on Metabolic Syndrome. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 2061.

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